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Google Voice Typing For PC Archives

Google Chrome Privacy Whitepaper

Last modified: June 3, 2020 (Current as of Chrome 83.0.4103.6)

This document describes the features in Chrome that communicate with Google, as well as with third-party services (for example, if you've changed your default search engine). This document also describes the controls available to you regarding how your data is used by Chrome. Here we’re focusing on the desktop version of Chrome; we touch only tangentially on Chrome OS and Chrome for Mobile. This document does not cover features that are still under development, such as features in the beta, dev and canary channel and active field trials, or Android apps on Chrome OS if Play Apps are enabled.

If you have a question about Google Chrome and Privacy that this document doesn’t answer, please feel free to ask it in the Community Forum. If you want to report a privacy issue, you can file it in our public bug tracker. For issues that include confidential information, please use this link. We’d be happy to hear from you.

Omnibox

Google Chrome uses a combined web address and search bar (we call it the “omnibox”) at the top of the browser window.

As you use the omnibox, your default search engine can suggest addresses and search queries that may be of interest to you. These suggestions make navigation and searching faster and easier, and are turned on by default. They can be turned off by unchecking "Autocomplete searches and URLs" in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome's settings.

When not in Incognito mode, in order to provide these suggestions, Chrome sends the text you've typed into the omnibox, along with a general categorization (e.g., "URL", "search query", or "unknown"), to your default search engine. Chrome will also send a signal to your default search engine when you focus in the omnibox, telling it to get ready to provide suggestions. That signal includes the URL of the currently displayed search engine results page. Your IP address and certain cookies are also sent to your default search engine with all requests, in order to return the results that are most relevant to you.

To provide suggestions and search results faster, Chrome may preconnect to your default search engine in the background. Chrome will not preconnect if you have either turned off “Preload pages for faster browsing and searching” in the “Cookies” part of “Privacy and security” section or "Autocomplete searches and URLs" in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome's settings. When Chrome preconnects, it resolves the search engine’s IP address and connects it to the search engine, exposing your IP address.

When in Incognito mode, in order to provide these suggestions, Chrome relies on an on-device model that does not communicate with your default search engine until you select a suggestion.

If Chrome determines that your typing may contain sensitive information, such as authentication credentials, local file names, or URL data that is normally encrypted, it will not send the typed text.

If Google is your default search engine, when you select one of the omnibox suggestions, Chrome sends your original search query, the suggestion you selected, and the position of the suggestion back to Google. This information helps improve the quality of the suggestion feature, and it's logged and anonymized in the same manner as Google web searches. Logs of these suggestion requests are retained for two weeks, after which 2% of the log data is randomly selected, anonymized, and retained in order to improve the suggestion feature.

If you've chosen to sync your Chrome history, and if Google is your default search engine, the URL of the page you’re viewing is sent to Google in order to provide better, contextually relevant suggestions. URLs are sent only for HTTP pages and HTTPS pages, not other schemes such as file: and ftp:. Additionally, Chrome may present website and search query suggestions as soon as you place the cursor in the omnibox, before you start typing. Chrome is in the process of transitioning to a new service to provide these on-focus suggestions. For most users on desktop versions of Chrome, the request and complete set of suggestions are retained on Google servers in order to further improve and personalize the feature. When the URL that triggered the set of suggestions is deleted from your history, the set of suggestions will stop influencing suggestions personalized to you, and will be deleted; otherwise they are retained in your Google account for a year. For a small portion of users on desktop versions of Chrome, and users on mobile versions of Chrome, the logging described in the previous paragraphs apply except that URLs are never included in the 2% sampling of log data.

On Android, your location will also be sent to Google via an X-Geo HTTP request header if Google is your default search engine, the Chrome app has the permission to use your geolocation, and you haven’t blocked geolocation for www.google.com (or country-specific origins such as www.google.de). Additionally, if your device has network location enabled (High Accuracy or Battery Saving Device Location mode in Android settings), the X-Geo header may also include visible network IDs (WiFi and Cell), used to geocode the request server-side. The X-Geo header will never be sent in Incognito mode. HTTPS will be required to include this header in the request. You can learn more about how to control the Android OS location sharing with apps on this article for Nexus, or find your device here if you do not use a Nexus. How to control location sharing with a site within Chrome is written in this article. See the Geolocation section of this whitepaper for more information on default geolocation permissions.

Additionally, if Google is your default search engine and you have enabled sync, omnibox may also show suggestions for your Google Drive files. You can turn this functionality off by disabling the “Drive suggestions” option in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome’s settings.

If you use a non-Google search provider as your default search engine, queries are sent and logged under that provider's privacy policy.

Additionally, when you use the omnibox to search for a single word, Chrome may send this word to your DNS server to see whether it corresponds to a host on your network, and may try to connect to the corresponding host. This gives you the option to navigate to that host instead of searching. For example, if your router goes by the hostname “router”, and you type “router” in the omnibox, you’re given the option to navigate to https://router/, as well as to search for the word “router” with your default search provider. This feature is not controlled by the "Use a prediction service to help complete searches and URLs..." option because it does not involve sending data to your default search engine.

Network predictions

Chrome uses a prediction service to load pages more quickly. The prediction service uses navigation history and local heuristics to predict which resources and pages are likely to be needed next, and it initiates actions such as DNS prefetching, TCP and TLS preconnection, and prefetching of web pages. To turn off network predictions, uncheck “Preload pages for faster browsing and searching” in the “Privacy and security > Cookies” section of Chrome’s settings on desktop, in the “Privacy” section of Chrome’s settings on Android, and in the “Bandwidth” section of Chrome’s settings on iOS.

To improve load times, the browser can be asked to prefetch links that you might click next. Chrome supports five types of prefetching:

  • Chrome prefetching - can be initiated by Chrome itself whenever it detects a search query typed in the omnibox, a likely beginning of a URL you type often in the omnibox, or when you have Lite mode enabled and are visiting Google Search.
  • Webpage prefetching - requested by one web page to prefetch another
  • AMP prefetching - can be requested only by the Google Search App on Android to prefetch several accelerated mobile pages (AMP) articles and display them later in a Chrome Custom Tab
  • CustomTabs prefetching - any Android app can request to prefetch several URLs to speed up displaying them later in a Chrome Custom Tab
  • Privacy-preserving search result link prefetching - for Lite mode users

Controlling the feature. All prefetching types except webpage prefetching are controlled by Chrome’s prediction service setting. Webpage prefetching is allowed regardless of whether Chrome’s network prediction service feature is enabled.

Handling of cookies. Except for the Lite mode-only prefetching case, the prefetched site is allowed to set and read its own cookies even if you don’t end up visiting the prefetched page, and prefetching is disabled if you have chosen to block third-party cookies. In the Lite mode-only case, prefetching is disabled if you have a cookie for the site, and the site can only set a cookie once you click on the link that was prefetched (see the Lite mode section for more details).

Javascript execution. For AMP prefetching the page is fully rendered and Javascript is also executed. For the remaining types of prefetching Javascript is not executed.

Google search locale

If Google is set as your default search engine, Chrome will try to determine the most appropriate locale for Google search queries conducted from the omnibox in order to give you relevant search results based on your location. For example, if you were in Germany, your omnibox searches may go through google.de instead of google.com.

In order to do this, Chrome will send a request to google.com each time you start the browser. If you already have any cookies from the google.com domain, this request will also include these cookies, and is logged as any normal HTTPS request to google.com would be (see the description of “server logs” in the privacy key terms for details). If you do not have any cookies from google.com, this request will not create any.

New Tab page

The Chrome New Tab page may display suggestions for websites that you might want to visit.

In order to help you get started, Chrome may suggest content that is popular in your country or region. Chrome uses your IP address to identify your country or region.

Chrome tries to make personalized suggestions that are useful to you. For this, Chrome uses the sites you have visited from your local browsing history. On Android, the most popular languages of the sites you visited may also be sent to Google to provide suggestions in languages you prefer to read, and the device display DPI may be sent to format content for your device. To save data, Chrome may additionally send a hash of the content that Google provided to you the last time, so that you only download content when there is something new.

If you are signed into Chrome, suggestions are also based on data stored in your Google account activity. You can control the collection of data in your Google account at Activity controls and manage your account activity at My Activity. For example, if you sync your browsing history and have enabled its use in your Web & App activity, Google may suggest sites that relate to sites you have visited in the past. Chrome measures the quality of suggestions by sending Google information about the sets of suggestions that were displayed, and those that were selected.

On the desktop version of Chrome, you may also manually add shortcuts to websites that you regularly visit, or edit Chrome’s existing website suggestions. After you add, edit, or delete a shortcut to a website, the Chrome New Tab page will not suggest any new websites to you.

Suggestions generated from your browsing history will be removed once you clear your browsing history. However, if you customized your suggestions, they will not be removed.

For Chrome on Android, in certain countries, Chrome may download the content of the New Tab page suggestions from Google, for use while offline. Chrome sends to Google a cookieless request with the URL for each suggestion, along with Chrome’s user agent string, in order to render the content. You can remove downloaded content by clearing Chrome’s cache data, or by opening the Downloads menu and selecting individual pages to delete. You can disable this feature by disabling “Download articles for you on Wi-Fi” in Chrome’s Downloads settings.

For Chrome on Android, if you’re signed in to Chrome, your preferences for the suggested articles can be modified or removed using the “Manage Interests” option from any suggested article menu. Your preferences will be sent to Google so that better suggestions are provided to you in the future. For example, if you indicate that you’re not interested in a particular topic or publisher, suggestions about that topic or publisher will not be shown in the future.

For desktop and Android versions of Chrome, when you open a new tab, Chrome loads a New Tab page customized by your default search engine (e.g., google.com) if it’s available. This page is preloaded in the background and refreshed periodically so that it opens quickly. Your IP address and cookies, as well as your current browser theme, are sent to your search engine with each refresh request so that the New Tab page can be correctly displayed. See the Embedded Search API for more details. Your search engine may also record your interactions with the New Tab page.

The New Tab page content may be designed by your default search provider. Suggested websites are embedded by Chrome into the New Tab page in a way that does not expose them to your default search provider.

If your default search provider is Google, the New Tab page also contains a web address and search bar that behaves like the omnibox.

This information about the New Tab page may not apply if you've installed an extension that overrides the New Tab page.

Touch to Search

If you've enabled "Touch to Search" on Chrome Mobile you can search for terms by selecting them.

When you select a word, the word, the surrounding text, and the home country of your device's SIM card are sent to Google to identify recommended search terms (for example, selecting "whale" on a site about the blue whale would lead to the selection expanding to show "blue whale"). The selected word is logged in accordance with standard Google logging policies, and the surrounding text and home country are logged only when the page is already in Google's search index. If you have turned on “Make searches and browsing better”, the URL of the page is also sent and logged, and is used to improve your query suggestions.

When Google returns a search suggestion, a card appears that may present an action or additional information related to the search. Opening this card is considered a regular search and navigation on Google, so standard logging policies apply.

Adjusting a selection causes a search for the exact selection. For example, if the user selects "climate" and the selection is automatically expanded to "climate change", the user can adjust the selection back to just "climate" and opening the panel would show full search results for "climate" rather than "climate change". Saying “Ok Google” after selecting a word provides the word and its surrounding text as context for the Google Assistant.

Touch to Search is enabled in a limited mode by default: potentially privacy-sensitive data, such as the URL and surrounding text, is not sent for HTTPS pages. Touch to Search can be fully enabled and disabled in the card or in the Chrome privacy settings.

Safe Browsing protection

Google Chrome includes an optional feature called "Safe Browsing" to help protect you against phishing, social engineering, malware, unwanted software, malicious ads, intrusive ads, and abusive websites or extensions. You can find more information at safebrowsing.google.com about how Safe Browsing protects you in Chrome and other Google products. Safe Browsing is designed specifically to protect your privacy and is also used by other popular browsers. This feature is not available on the iOS version of Chrome.

You can find settings for Safe Browsing in the “Privacy and security > Security” section of Chrome’s settings. When Safe Browsing is enabled in the “Standard protection” mode (pictured below), Chrome contacts Google's servers periodically to download the most recent Safe Browsing list of unsafe sites including sites associated with phishing, social engineering, malware, unwanted software, malicious ads, intrusive ads, and abusive websites or Chrome extensions. The most recent copy of this list is stored locally on your system. Chrome checks the URL of each site you visit or file you download against this local list. If you navigate to a URL that appears on the list, Chrome sends a partial URL fingerprint (the first 32 bits of a SHA-256 hash of the URL) to Google for verification that the URL is indeed dangerous. Chrome also sends a partial URL fingerprint when a site requests a potentially dangerous permission, so that Google can protect you if the site is malicious. Google cannot determine the actual URL from this information.

In addition to the URL check described above, Chrome also conducts client-side checks. If a website looks suspicious, Chrome sends a subset of likely phishing and social engineering terms found on the page to Google, in order to determine whether the website should be considered malicious. Chrome can also help protect you from phishing if you type one of your previously saved passwords into an uncommon site. In this case Chrome sends the URL and referrers of the page to Google to see if the page might be trying to steal your password.

If you encounter a website that is on Chrome’s Safe Browsing list, you may see a warning like the one shown below.

You can visit our malware warning test page or social engineering warning test page to see the above example in action. For more information about the warning pages, see Manage warnings about unsafe sites.

Additionally, if you've opted into “Make Searches and Browsing Better (sends URLs of the pages you visit to Google)”, Chrome sends a request to Safe Browsing each time you visit a page that isn’t in Chrome’s local list of safe sites in order to gather the latest reputation of that website (we call this mechanism “real-time checks”). If you sync your browsing history without a sync passphrase, this request also contains a temporary authentication token tied to your Google account to provide better protections to some users whose account may be under attack. If the website is deemed unsafe by Safe Browsing, you may see a warning like the one shown above. This mechanism is designed to catch unsafe sites that switch domains very quickly or hide from Google's crawlers. Pages loaded in Incognito are not checked using this mechanism.

You can also opt in to reporting additional data relevant to security to help improve Safe Browsing and security on the Internet. You can opt in by turning on the “Help improve security on the web for everyone” setting in the “Privacy and security > Security” section of Chrome's settings. You can also opt in from the warning page shown above. If you opt in, Chrome will send an incident report to Google every time you receive a warning, visit a suspicious page, and on a very small fraction of sites where Chrome thinks there could be threats, to help Safe Browsing learn about the new threats you may be encountering. Additionally, some downloaded files that are suspicious and show a warning may be sent to Google for investigation each time they are encountered. All reports are sent to Google over an encrypted channel and can include URLs, headers, and snippets of content from the page and they never include data from browsing you do in Incognito mode. If Chrome discovers unwanted or malicious software on your machine, the reports may also include details about malicious files and registry entries. This data is used only to improve Safe Browsing and to improve security on the Internet. For example, Chrome reports some SSL certificate chains to Google to help improve the accuracy of Chrome’s SSL warnings.

Please be aware that if you disable the Safe Browsing feature, Chrome will no longer be able to protect you from websites that try to steal your information or install harmful software. We don't recommend turning it off.

If you are a webmaster, developer, or network admin, you can find more relevant information about Safe Browsing on this page.

Safe Browsing also protects you from abusive extensions and malicious software. When Chrome starts, and on each update of the Safe Browsing list, Chrome scans extensions installed in your browser against the Safe Browsing list. If an extension on the list is found, Chrome will disable the extension, offer you relevant information and may provide an option for you to remove the extension or re-enable it. Chrome also sends the particular extension ID to Safe Browsing. If you attempt to download a file on Chrome’s Safe Browsing list, you'll see a warning like this one:

To warn you about potentially dangerous files, like the picture shown above, Chrome checks the URL of potentially dangerous file types you download against a list of URLs that have been verified. Potentially dangerous file types include both executables and commonly-abused document types. This list is stored locally on your computer and updated regularly. Chrome does not send information to Google for files you download from URLs in this list, or if the file is signed by a verified publisher. For all other unverified potentially dangerous file downloads, Chrome sends Google the information needed to help determine whether the download is harmful, including some or all of the following: information about the full URL of the site or file download, all related referrers and redirects, code signing certificates, file hashes, and file header information. Chrome may then show a warning like the one pictured above.

If you are enrolled in Google's Advanced Protection Program, Chrome will show you additional warnings when you download files but where Safe Browsing is unable to ascertain they are safe.

Chrome helps protect you against password phishing by checking with Google when you enter your password on an uncommon page. Chrome keeps a local list of popular websites that Safe Browsing found to be safe. If Chrome detects that you have entered your Google account password or one of your passwords stored in Chrome’s password manager on a website that’s not on the list, it sends a request to Safe Browsing to gather the reputation of that website. The verdict received from Safe Browsing is usually cached on your device for 1 week. For users who have enabled the "Help improve security on the web for everyone" setting, Chrome will ignore the list of popular websites for a small fraction of visits, to test the accuracy of that list.

If the reused password is your Google account password and the verdict for the website is that it is phishing, Chrome will suggest that you change your Google account password to avoid losing access to your account.

If you sync your browsing history without a sync passphrase, or if you accept the “Protect account” option from the dialog shown below, Chrome sends a request to Google to protect your account. This request contains the URL where the phishing attempt happened, and the verdict received from Safe Browsing.

If you've opted into “Help improve security on the web for everyone”, Chrome also sends a request to Safe Browsing each time you start to enter a password on a page that isn’t in Chrome’s local list. In addition, the request Chrome sends to Safe Browsing to determine the reputation of the website on which you reuse your password includes the list of websites for which you saved this password in Chrome’s password manager (but not the password itself).

If Chrome detects that your settings have been tampered with, Chrome reports the URL of the last downloaded potentially dangerous file, and information about the nature of the possible tampering, to the Safe Browsing service.

Chrome asks your permission before using certain web features (APIs) that might have associated risks. Some sites trigger these permission requests in ways users find undesirable or annoying. On these sites Chrome may send the partial URL fingerprint to Google to verify if a less intrusive UI should be used to surface the request.

If you’ve opted into “Enhanced protection” (pictured above), in addition to all the protections described above for “Standard protection” mode, Chrome will use the real-time checks mechanism described above for checking the Safe Browsing reputation of top-level URLs and iframe URLs. If you're signed in to Chrome, the requests for performing real-time checks and the requests for checking potentially dangerous file downloads contain a temporary authentication token tied to your Google account that is used to protect you across Google apps. Enhanced protection also enables reporting additional data relevant to security to help improve Safe Browsing and overall web security, and it enables Chrome’s password breach detection. When browsing in incognito or guest mode, these extra checks do not occur, and Enhanced protection mode operates the same way as Standard protection.

For all Safe Browsing requests and reports, Google logs the transferred data in its raw form and retains this data for up to 30 days. Google collects standard log information for Safe Browsing requests, including an IP address and one or more cookies. After at most 30 days, Safe Browsing deletes the raw logs, storing only calculated data in an anonymized form that does not include your IP addresses or cookies. Additionally, Safe Browsing requests won’t be associated with your Google Account, except if the request includes the temporary authentication token described above. They are, however, tied to the other Safe Browsing requests made from the same device.

For Chrome on iOS 13 and later, Apple allows for connecting to multiple Safe Browsing services. This means that Chrome may connect to a third-party Safe Browsing service instead of the Google one. Apple determines which Safe Browsing service to connect to based on factors like your device locale.

Safety Check

Google Chrome on Desktop includes a Safety check feature to be found in settings. Running the Safety check verifies whether the browser is up to date, whether Safe Browsing is enabled, whether your passwords have been exposed as a part of a data breach, and whether you have potentially harmful extensions installed.

Unwanted software protection

The Windows version of Chrome is able to detect and remove certain types of software that violate Google's Unwanted Software Policy. If left in your system, this software may perform unwanted actions, such as changing your Chrome settings without your approval. Chrome periodically scans your device to detect potentially unwanted software. In addition, if you have opted in to automatically report details of possible security incidents to Google, Chrome will report information about unwanted software, including relevant file metadata and system settings linked to the unwanted software found on your computer.

If you perform an unwanted software check on your computer from the Settings page, Chrome reports information about unwanted software and your system. System information includes metadata about programs installed or running on your system that could be associated with harmful software, such as: services and processes, scheduled tasks, system registry values commonly used by malicious software, command-line arguments of Chrome shortcuts, Windows proxy settings, and software modules loaded into Chrome or the network stack. You can opt out of sharing this data by deselecting the checkbox next to "Report details to Google" before starting the scan.

If unwanted software is detected, Chrome will offer you an option to clean it up by using the Chrome Cleanup Tool. This will quarantine detected malicious files, delete harmful extensions and registry keys, and reset your settings. The Chrome Cleanup Tool also reports information about unwanted software and your system to Google, and again you can opt out of sharing this data by deselecting the checkbox next to "Report details to Google" before starting the cleanup.

This data is used for the purpose of improving Google’s ability to detect unwanted software and offer better protection to Chrome users. It is used in accordance with Google’s Privacy Policy and is stored for up to 14 days, after which only aggregated statistics are retained.

Navigation error tips

Google Chrome can show tips to help guide you to the page you were trying to reach in cases where the web address cannot be found, a connection cannot be made, the server returns a very short (under 512 byte) error message, or you've navigated to a parked domain.

Google Chrome will first check the address against a locally-stored list of suspected parked domains. If there is a match, Chrome sends a partial fingerprint (a hash prefix) of the URL to Google for verification that the domain is indeed parked. This uses the same methodology as the Safe Browsing service (see the “Safe Browsing protection” section, above).

In the case of other navigation errors, the URL of the web page you're trying to reach is stripped of all GET parameters, and then sent to Google in order to retrieve navigation tips. This information is logged and anonymized in the same manner as Google web searches. The logs are used to ensure and improve the quality of the feature.

Additionally, to provide you with more informative error messages when a domain name cannot be found, Chrome will investigate the underlying cause by attempting to resolve “google.com” using both Google Public DNS and the default DNS service configured for your system.

In the event that Chrome detects SSL connection timeouts, certificate errors, or other network issues that might be caused by a captive portal (a hotel's WiFi network, for instance), Chrome will make a cookieless request to https://www.gstatic.com/generate_204 and check the response code. If that request is redirected, Chrome will open the redirect target in a new tab on the assumption that it's a login page. Requests to the captive portal detection page are not logged.

You can disable navigation error tips by unchecking "Show suggestions for similar pages when a page can't be found" in the "Sync and Google services" section of Chrome's settings.

Offline Indicator

On Android versions Lollipop and older, when Chrome detects a network change, it sends a cookieless request to http://connectivitycheck.gstatic.com/generate_204 or http://clients4.google.com/generate_204 to determine whether you’re offline and display an offline indicator.

Software updates

Desktop versions of Chrome and the Google Chrome Apps Launcher use Google Update to keep you up to date with the latest and most secure versions of software. In order to provide greater transparency and to make the technology available to other applications, the Google Update technology is open source.

Google Update requests include information necessary for the update process, such as the version of Chrome, its release channel, basic hardware information, and update errors that have been encountered. The update requests also send Google information that helps us understand how many people are using Google Chrome and the Chrome Apps Launcher ⎼ specifically, whether the software was used in the last day, the number of days since the last time it was used, the total number of days it has been installed, and the number of active profiles. Google Update also periodically sends a non-unique four-letter tag that contains information about how you obtained Google Chrome. This tag is not personally identifiable, does not encode any information about when you obtained Google Chrome, and is the same as everyone who obtained Google Chrome the same way.

Because Chrome OS updates the entire OS stack, Google Update on Chrome OS also sends the current Chrome OS version and hardware model information to Google in order to ensure that the correct software updates and hardware manufacturer customizations such as apps, wallpaper, and help articles are delivered. This information is not personally identifiable, and is common to all users of Chrome OS on the same revision of device.

Unlike the desktop versions of Chrome, the delivery and management of updates for mobile versions of Chrome are managed through the app stores for Android and iOS. Mobile versions of Chrome utilize the servers described above for counting active installations.

Chrome extensions and applications that you’ve installed are kept up to date with a similar system used for updating desktop versions of Chrome. These update requests include similar information (such as the application ID, when the application was last used, and how long it’s been installed). We use these requests to determine the aggregate popularity and usage of applications and extensions. If you are using an extension or application restricted to a certain audience, authentication tokens are sent with the update requests for these add-ons. For security reasons, Chrome also occasionally sends a cookieless request to the Chrome Web Store, in order to verify that installed extensions and applications that claim to be from the store are genuine.

In order to keep updates as small as possible, Google Chrome is internally split into a variety of components, each of which can be updated independently. Each component is uniquely identified via an ID that is shared among all Google Chrome installations (e.g., “fmeadaodfnidclnjhlkdgjkolmhmfofk”). An update request for a component contains this ID, the hash of the previous download (called a "fingerprint"), and the component’s version. Because every installation has the same ID, and downloads of the same component have the same fingerprint, none of this information is personally identifiable.

If you install web apps on an Android device, a Google server is responsible for creating a native Android package that can be verified for authenticity by Chrome. When Chrome is updated or notices that the web app's manifest has changed, Chrome asks the server for a new version of the Android package in a cookieless request. If the information needed to create the native Android package cannot be acquired by the server (e.g., because the information is behind a corporate firewall), Chrome sends it to Google and an Android package is created that is unique to you. It contains a unique and random identifier that is not tied to your identity.

Chrome may also download and run a binary executable (e.g., as part of the software update or to improve Safe Browsing protection). These executables are cryptographically signed and verified before execution. Chrome may download further static resources like dictionaries on demand to reduce the size of the installer.

On Windows and OS X versions of Chrome, the recovery component tries to repair Google Update when it’s broken. After the relevant binary is executed, Google Update uploads statistics on the actions that were performed. These statistics contain no personally identifiable information.

Network time

On desktop platforms, Chrome uses network time to verify SSL certificates, which are valid only for a specified time. At random intervals or when Chrome encounters an expired SSL certificate, Chrome may send requests to Google to obtain the time from a trusted source. These requests are more frequent if Chrome believes the system clock is inaccurate. These requests contain no cookies and are not logged on the server.

Counting installations

In order to measure the success rate of Google Chrome downloads and installations of the Windows version of Google Chrome, a randomly-generated token is included with Google Chrome's installer. This token is sent to Google during the installation process to confirm the success of that particular installation. A new token is generated for every install. It is not associated with any personal information, and is deleted once Google Chrome runs and checks for updates the first time.

For Chrome to know how many active installations it has, the mobile version of Chrome sends a ping to Google with a salted hash of a device identifier on an ongoing basis. The desktop version of Chrome does not send any stable identifier to count active installations. Instead an anonymous message to Google with a timestamp of the last ping is used to infer number of active installations.

Measuring effectiveness of a promotion

Chrome utilizes two measurements to understand how effective a promotional campaign has been: how many Chrome installations are acquired through a promotional campaign, and how much Chrome usage and traffic to Google is driven by a campaign.

To measure installations or reactivations of Chrome through a campaign, Chrome will send a token or an identifier unique to your device to Google at the first launch of Chrome, as well as the first search using Google. On desktop versions of Chrome, a token unique to your device is generated. The same token will be sent if Chrome is later reinstalled at first launch and at first use of the Omnibox after reinstallation or reactivation. Rather than storing the token on the computer, it is generated when necessary by using built-in system information that is scrambled in an irreversible manner. On iOS, Chrome uses the IDFA for counting installations acquired by a campaign, and it can be reset in iOS settings.

To measure searches and Chrome usage driven by a particular campaign, Chrome inserts a promotional tag, not unique to you or your device, in the searches you perform on Google. This non-unique tag contains information about how Chrome was obtained, the week when Chrome was installed, and the week when the first search was performed. For desktop versions of Chrome, Chrome generates a promotional tag, if the promotional installation token described in the previous paragraph indicates that Chrome has been installed or reactivated by a campaign on a device which has not been associated with any campaign yet. For Chrome on Mobile, a promotional tag is always sent regardless of the source of installations.

The promotional tag is generated using a software library called "RLZ" and looks similar to “1T4ADBR_enUS236US239”. The RLZ library was fully open-sourced in June 2010. For more information, please see the In the Open, for RLZ post on the Chromium blog and the article “How To Read An RLZ String”. On Android, this promotional tag can also be a readable string like "android-hms-tmobile-us" instead of an RLZ string, and is not unique to either you or your device.

This non-unique promotional tag is included when performing searches via Google (the tag appears as a parameter beginning with "rlz=" when triggered from the Omnibox, or as an “x-rlz-string” HTTP header). We use this information to measure the searches and Chrome usage driven by a particular promotion.

If usage statistics and crash reports are enabled, the RLZ string is sent along with the report. This allows us to improve Chrome based on variations that are limited to specific geographic regions.

For the desktop version of Chrome, you can opt-out of sending this data to Google by uninstalling Chrome, and installing a version downloaded directly from www.google.com/chrome. To opt-out of sending the RLZ string in Chrome OS, press Ctrl + Alt + T to open the crosh shell, type rlz disable followed by the enter key, and then reboot your device.

Usage statistics and crash reports

Chrome has a feature to automatically send usage statistics and crash reports to Google in order to help improve Chrome’s feature set and stability.

Usage statistics contain information such as system information, preferences, user interface feature usage, responsiveness, performance, and memory usage. Crash reports contain system information gathered at the time of the crash, and may contain web page URLs or personal information depending on what was happening at the time of the crash. This feature is enabled by default for Chrome installations of version 54 or later. You can control the feature in the "Sync and Google services" section of Chrome's settings.

When this feature is enabled, Google Chrome stores a randomly generated unique token on your device, which is sent to Google along with your usage statistics and crash reports. The token does not contain any personal information and is used to de-duplicate reports and maintain accuracy in statistics. This token is deleted when the feature is disabled and a new token is regenerated when the feature is enabled again.

By default, the usage statistics do not include any personal information. However, if you're signed in to Chrome and have enabled Chrome sync, Chrome may combine your declared age and gender from your Google account with our statistics to help us build products better suited for your demographics. This demographic data is not included in crash reports.

Along with usage statistics and crash reports, Chrome also reports anonymous, randomized data that is constructed in a manner which is not linked to the unique token, and which ensures that no information can be inferred about any particular user's activity. This data collection mechanism is summarized on the Google research blog, and full technical details have been published in a technical report and presented at the 2014 ACM Computer and Communications Security conference.

Chrome will also anonymously report to Google if requests to websites operated by Google fail or succeed in order to detect and fix problems quickly.

If you have also turned on “Make searches and browsing better (Sends URLs of pages you visit to Google)” in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome’s settings, Chrome usage statistics include information about the web pages you visit and your usage of them. The information will also include the URLs and statistics related to downloaded files. If you sync extensions, these statistics will also include information about the extensions that have been installed from Chrome Web Store. The URLs and statistics are sent along with a unique device identifier that can be reset by turning off “Make searches and browsing better” in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome’s settings or by turning off usage statistics and crash reports. The usage statistics are not tied to your Google account. Google only stores usage statistics associated with published extensions, and URLs that are known by Google’s web crawlers. We use this information to improve our products and services, for example, by identifying web pages which load slowly; this gives us insight into how to best improve overall Chrome performance. We also make some statistics available externally, through efforts like the Chrome User Experience Report. Externally published reports are conducted in highly aggregated manner to not reveal individual user's identity.

On iOS, if you are syncing your browsing history without a sync passphrase, Chrome reports usage for certain URLs that other Google apps could open. For example, when you tap on an email address, Chrome presents a dialog that allows you to choose between opening with Google Gmail or other mail apps installed on your device. The usage information also includes which apps were presented to you, which one was selected, and if a Google app was installed. Chrome does not log the actual URL tapped. If you are signed in, this usage is tied to your Google account. If you are signed out, the information is sent to Google with a unique device identifier that can be regenerated by resetting the Google Usage ID found in Chrome settings. The raw reports are deleted within 60 days, after which only the aggregated statistics remain.

Google Surveys in Chrome

In Chrome on Android and Desktop, when you have "send usage statistics" enabled, you may be randomly selected to participate in surveys to evaluate consumer satisfaction with Chrome features. If you are selected, Chrome requests a survey from Google for you. If a survey is available, Chrome then asks you to answer the survey and submit responses to Google.

The survey also records basic metrics about your actions, such as time spent looking at the survey and elements that the user clicked. These metrics are sent to Google even if you do not fully complete the survey.

Google uses strategies to ensure that surveys are spread evenly across users and not repeatedly served to a single user. On Android, Chrome stores a randomly generated unique token on the device. On Desktop, Chrome uses a cookie to connect with the server. This token or cookie is used solely for the survey requests and does not contain any personal information. If you disable sending usage statistics, the token or cookie will be cleared.

Suggestions for spelling errors

Desktop versions of Chrome can provide smarter spell-checking by sending text you type into the browser to Google's servers, allowing you to apply the same spell-checking technology that’s used by Google products like Docs. If this feature is enabled, Chrome sends the entire contents of text fields as you type in them to Google, along with the browser’s default language. Google returns a list of suggested spellings that are displayed in the context menu. Cookies are not sent along with these requests. Requests are logged temporarily and anonymously for debugging and quality improvement purposes.

This feature is disabled by default; to turn it on, click “Ask Google for suggestions” in the context menu that appears when you right-click on a misspelled word. You can also turn this feature on or off with the “Enhanced spell check” checkbox in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome settings. When the feature is turned off, spelling suggestions are generated locally without sending data to Google's servers.

Mobile versions of Chrome rely on the operating system to provide spell-checking.

Translate

Google Chrome’s built-in translation feature helps you read more of the Web, regardless of the language of the web page. The feature is enabled by default.

Translation can be disabled at any time in Chrome’s settings.

Language detection is done entirely using a client-side library, and does not involve any Google servers. For translation, the contents of a web page are only sent to Google if you decide to have it translated. You can do that on an individual basis on each page that shows a translation option or for all pages in a specific language by choosing “Always translate” in the Translate UI. Additionally, you can do so by clicking on a translated search result on the Google Search Results Page.

If you do choose to translate a web page, the text of that page is sent to Google Translate for translation. Your cookies are not sent along with that request and the request is sent over SSL. This communication with Google's translation service is covered by the Google privacy policy.

If you’ve chosen to sync your Chrome history, statistics about the languages of pages you visit and about your interactions with the translation feature will be sent to Google to improve Chrome’s understanding of the languages you speak and when Chrome should offer to translate text for you.

Image Descriptions for screen reader users

Chrome can provide automatic descriptions for users who are visually impaired by sending the contents of images on pages you visit to Google's servers. This feature is only enabled when Chrome detects that the user has a screen reader running and if the user explicitly enables it in the page context menu. Cookies are not sent along with these requests. Requests are not logged.

Sign In to Chrome and sync

You have the option to use the Chrome browser while signed in to your Google Account, with or without sync enabled.

On desktop versions of Chrome, signing into or out of any Google web service, like google.com, signs you into or out of Chrome. If you are signed in to Chrome, Chrome may offer to save your payment cards and related billing information to your Google Payments account. Chrome may also offer you the option of filling payment cards from your Google Payments account into web forms. If you would like to sign into Google web services, like google.com, without Chrome asking whether you want to save your info to your Google Account, you can turn off Chrome sign-in.

When you’re signed-in and have enabled sync with your Google Account, your personal browsing data information is saved in your Google Account so you may access it when you sign in and sync to Chrome on other computers and devices. Synced data can include bookmarks, saved passwords, open tabs, browsing history, extensions, addresses, phone numbers, payment methods, and more. In advanced sync settings, you can choose which types of data to synchronize with this device. By default, all syncable data types are enabled. You can turn sync on or off in the “You and Google” section of Chrome settings.

If you have turned on sync and signed out of the account you are syncing to, sync will pause sending all syncable data to Google until you sign back in with the same account. Some sync data types (such as bookmarks and passwords) that are saved locally while sync is paused will automatically be synced to your account after you sign back in with the same account.

On mobile versions of Chrome, you can sign into or sign out of Chrome from Chrome settings. Signing into Chrome will also turn on sync. This can be done for any account that has already been added to the mobile device without authenticating again.

On both desktop and mobile, signing into Chrome keeps you signed into Google web services until you sign out of Chrome. On mobile, signing into Chrome will keep you signed in with all Google Accounts that have been added to the device. On desktop, it will keep you signed in with all Google Accounts that you added from a Google web service, unless you have set “Clear cookies and site data when you quit Chrome” in your cookie settings.

On Android and desktop, Chrome signals to Google web services that you are signed into Chrome by attaching an X-Chrome-Connected and/or C-Chrome-ID-Consistency-Request header to any HTTPS requests to Google-owned domains. On iOS, the CHROME_CONNECTED cookie is used instead. This allows those Google web services to update their UI accordingly. If you are using a managed device, your system admin may disable the sign in feature or require that data be deleted when you disconnect your account.

Users can share phone numbers and text between their devices (mobile or desktop) when they are signed-in to Chrome. The transferred data is encrypted during transit and Google cannot read or store the content. To let users select the device to share with, Chrome collects the following information about devices on which a user is signed-in and stores that in the user's Google account: device manufacturer, model number, Chrome version, OS, and device type.

Google uses your personal synchronized data to provide you a consistent browsing experience across your devices, and to customize features in Chrome. You can manage your synchronized history by going to chrome://history in your Chrome browser. If “Include history from Chrome and other apps in your Web & App Activity” is checked on the Web & App Activity controls page, Google also uses your synchronized browsing data to provide personalized Google products and services to you. You can change your preference any time, and manage individual activities associated with your Google account.

The paragraph above describes the use of your personal browsing history. Google also uses aggregated and anonymized synchronized browsing data to improve other Google products and services. For example, we use this information to improve Google Search by helping to detect mobile friendly pages, pages which have stopped serving content, and downloads of malware.

If you would like to use Google's cloud to store and sync your Chrome data without allowing any personalized and aggregated use by Google as described in the previous paragraphs, you can choose to encrypt all of your synced data with a sync passphrase. If you choose this option, it’s important to note that Google won’t have access to the sync passphrase you set; we won’t be able to help you recover data if you forget the passphrase. Regardless of how you choose to encrypt your data, all data is always sent over secure SSL connections to Google’s servers.

Google will store the metadata about the days on which sync was running to improve other Google products and services.

If you're signed into Chrome and are syncing passwords and/or other types of login credentials without a sync passphrase, these credentials are stored in your Google Account. Chrome may help you sign in with credentials you've saved in Android apps on websites that are associated with the respective apps. Likewise, credentials you've saved for websites can be used to help you sign into related Android apps. You can view the credentials you've saved in Chrome and Android by visiting passwords.google.com in any browser. If you've saved credentials for Android applications, Chrome periodically sends a cookieless request to Google to get an updated list of websites that are associated with those applications. To stop websites and Android apps from automatically signing in using credentials you previously saved, you can turn off Auto Sign-In on passwords.google.com or in Chrome settings under "Autofill > Passwords". For more details see this article.

To make the history page easier to use, Chrome displays favicons of visited URLs. For Chrome browsing history from your other devices, these favicons are fetched from Google servers via cookieless requests that only contain the given URL and device display DPI. Favicons are not fetched for users with sync passphrase.

On the iOS version of Chrome, if you sync your browsing history without a sync passphrase and your browser’s usage statistics and crash reports setting is also enabled, your usage statistics and crash reports will include statistics about the pages you visit. You can read more in the Usage statistics and crash reports section of this Whitepaper.

All data synchronized through Google’s servers is subject to Google’s Privacy Policy. To get an overview of the Chrome data stored for your Google Account, go to the Chrome section of Google Dashboard. That page also allows you to stop synchronization completely and delete all sync data from Google’s servers.

Autofill and Password Management

Google Chrome has a form autofill feature that helps you fill out forms on the web more quickly. Autofill is enabled by default, but it can be turned off at any time in Chrome’s settings.

If Autofill is enabled and you encounter a web page containing a form, Chrome sends some information about that form to Google. This information includes a hash of the web page’s hostname, as well as form identifiers (such as field names), and the basic structure of the form. In response, Chrome receives a prediction of each field’s data type (for example, “field X is a phone number, and field Y is a country”). This information helps Chrome match up your locally stored Autofill data with the fields of the form.

If Autofill is enabled when you submit a form, Chrome sends Google some information about the form along with the types of data you submitted. This information includes a hash of the web page’s hostname, as well as form identifiers (such as field names), the basic structure of the form, and the observed data types for the fields (i.e., field X was a phone number, field Y was a country). The values you entered into the form are not sent to Google. This information helps Chrome improve the quality of its form-filling over time.

You can manage your Autofill entries via Chrome’s settings, and you can edit or delete saved information at any time. Chrome will never store full credit card information (card number, cardholder name, and expiration date) without explicit confirmation. In order to prevent offering to save cards you have shown disinterest in saving, Chrome stores the last four digits of detected credit cards locally on the device. If you scan your credit card using a phone camera, the recognition is performed locally.

Chrome may help you sign in to websites with credentials you've saved to Chrome's password manager or Google Smart Lock by autofilling sign-in forms, by offering you an account picker, or by automatically signing you in. You can manage and delete your saved credentials in the “Forms and passwords” section of Chrome’s settings. If you enable password management, the same kind of data about forms as described above is sent to Google to interpret password forms correctly. To enable Chrome to offer password generation that meets site-specific requirements, Chrome uploads a randomized vote on a specific password characteristic to the server once a user-created password is stored. If stored credentials are used for the first time in a username field which was already filled differently by the website itself, Chrome also transmits a short one-byte hash of the prefilled value. This allows Google to classify if the website uses a static placeholder in the username field which can be safely overwritten without deleting valuable user-specific data. Google cannot reconstruct the value from this hash.

When you sign in to a site, Chrome can give you a warning if the username/password have been exposed as a result of a data breach on some website or app. The feature is available on all platforms but only to the users signed in with a Google account. On Android the feature is only available if sync is also enabled, due to the way the accounts are managed by the OS. Being signed in to a Google account is a technical requirement that prevents abuse of the API. When you sign in to a website, Chrome will send a hashed copy of your username and password to Google encrypted with a secret key only known to Chrome. No one, including Google, is able to derive your username or password from this encrypted copy. From the response, Chrome can tell if the submitted username and password appear in the database of leaked credentials. The final resolution is done locally; Google doesn’t know whether or not the credential is present in the database. The feature can be disabled in settings under Sync and Google services. On desktop and Android versions of Chrome, this feature is not available if Safe Browsing is turned off.

Using the same secure method described above, you can check all the saved passwords against the public data breaches in the “Passwords” section of Chrome’s settings. Once you’ve run a password check, Chrome will show a list of breached passwords. If a password in this list is outdated, you can manually edit it to store the current version. If you choose to edit, the new username/password pair will be checked automatically but only if the feature described above is not disabled.

Also, if you choose, you can bring your Autofill data with you to all your Chrome-enabled devices by syncing it as part of your browser settings (see the “Sign In to Chrome” section of this document). If you choose to sync Autofill information, field values are sent as described in “Sign In to Chrome”; otherwise, field values are not sent.

Payments

When you’re signed into Chrome with your Google Account, Chrome may offer to save payment cards and related billing addresses into payment data under the same Google Account, and include cards from your account among the autofill suggestions on payment web forms. If you're not signed in, Chrome offers to save your credit cards locally. If the card is not stored locally, you will be prompted for your CVV code or device authentication, such as Touch ID or Windows Hello, each time you use the card. In some versions of Chrome, it is possible to store a card to Google Payments and locally in Chrome at the same time, in which case Chrome will not ask for a CVV or device authentication confirmation. If you have cards stored in this way, their local copies will persist until you sign out of your Google account, at which point the local copy will be deleted from your device. If you choose not to store the card locally, you will be prompted for your CVV code or device authentication each time you use the card. You can opt out of using device authentication in the Payment methods section of Chrome settings. If you use a card from Google Payments, Chrome will collect information about your computer and share it with Google Payments to prevent fraudulent use of your card.

To delete credit card information saved in Chrome, follow the “Add and edit credit cards” steps in the Autofill article. When you delete a credit card that's also saved in your Google Payments account, you will be redirected to Google Payments to complete the deletion. After your card has been deleted from your Google Payments account, Chrome will automatically remove that card from your Autofill suggestions.

To save a card locally on the device only, while still being signed in to Chrome with a Google Account, you can add a card from the “Add” button in the “Payment methods” section in Chrome settings. If you would like to sign into Google web services, like google.com, without Chrome asking whether you want to save your info to your Google Account, you can turn off Chrome sign-in. If you have sync turned on, you can disable syncing payment methods and addresses to Google Pay under “Sync” in Chrome settings. You can also turn the Payments Autofill feature off altogether in settings.

Chrome also supports the PaymentRequest API by allowing you to pay for purchases with credit cards from Autofill, Google Payments, and other payment apps already installed on your device. Google Payments and other payment apps are only available on Android devices. PaymentRequest allows the merchant to request the following information: full name, shipping address, billing address, phone number, email, credit card number, credit card expiration, CVV, and Google Payments credentials. Information is not shared with the merchant until you agree.

Geolocation

Google Chrome supports the Geolocation API, which provides access to fine-grained user location information with your consent.

By default, Chrome will request your permission when a web page asks for your location information, and does not send any location information to the web page unless you explicitly consent.

Furthermore, whenever you are on a web page which is using your location information, Chrome will display a location icon on the right side of the omnibox. You can click on this icon in order to find out more information or manage location settings.

In Chrome’s settings, by clicking “Site Settings” and scrolling to the “Location” section, you can choose to allow all sites to receive your location information, have Chrome ask you every time (the default), or block all sites from receiving your location information. You can also configure exceptions for specific web sites.

In the Android version of Chrome, your default search engine automatically receives your location when you conduct a search. On the iOS version of Chrome, by default your location is sent to Google if you conduct a search from the omnibox. Read more about how your default search engine handles geolocation and how to manage your settings in the Omnibox section of the whitepaper.

If you do choose to share your location with a web site, Chrome will send local network information to Google (also used by other browsers such as Mozilla Firefox) in order to estimate your location. This local network information can include data about nearby Wi-Fi access points or cellular signal sites/towers (even if you’re not using them), and your computer’s IP address. The requests are logged, and aggregated and anonymized before being used to operate, support, and improve the overall quality of Google Chrome and Google Location Services.

For further reading on the privacy and user interface implications of the Geolocation API (as well as other HTML5 APIs), see ”Practical Privacy Concerns in a Real World Browser” written by two Google Chrome team members.

Speech to text

Chrome supports the Web Speech API, a mechanism for converting speech to text on a web page. It uses Google's servers to perform the conversion. Using the feature sends an audio recording to Google (audio data is not sent directly to the page itself), along with the domain of the website using the API, your default browser language and the language settings of the website. Cookies are not sent along with these requests.

Google Assistant on Chrome OS devices

The Google Assistant is integrated into some models of Chrome OS devices. If you opt in to the feature, Chrome OS listens for you to say "Ok Google" and sends the audio of the next thing you say, plus a few seconds before, to Google. Detection of the phrase "Ok Google" is performed locally on your computer, and the audio is only sent to Google after it detects "Ok Google". You can enable or disable this feature in Google Assistant Settings.

Enabling this feature in Chrome Settings will cause Chrome to listen whenever the screen is unlocked. On Chrome OS devices with a local audio processor, the device also listens when the device is asleep. On these devices, The Google Assistant feature only works if Voice & Audio Activity is enabled for your Google account. Chrome will prompt you to enable Voice & Audio Activity for the associated Google account if it is disabled.

Once the audio has been converted to text, a search with that text is submitted to Google. If you have used the “Ok Google” search before on a device but turned off Voice & Audio Activity later, your device is still capable of processing your voice and sending the audio to Google but the voice is deleted shortly thereafter.

You can determine your Chrome OS device’s behavior by examining the text in the "Search and Assistant" section of settings.

Google Assistant on Android devices

You can quickly complete tasks on the web using the Google Assistant in Chrome on certain Android devices . If you opt-in to this feature, you can speak to the Google Assistant and ask it to search websites. It also can fill out forms on your behalf, or speed up the checkout experience.

For example, if you issue a command to the Google Assistant e.g. “search Wikipedia for Henry VIII”, the Google Assistant in Chrome will respond by opening Chrome to Wikipedia, sending the query as a text string to Google Assistant in Chrome, and searching for “Henry VIII” on the Wikipedia page.

As another example, if you ask the Google Assistant to help you purchase tickets for an upcoming movie, then the address of the website you are viewing, your credit card information, and your email address will be shared with Google to complete the transaction and make it possible for you to receive the purchase receipt and movie ticket.

If you opt-in to this feature, the Google Assistant in Chrome will send data to Google in order to complete the command you issued. When the command is issued, the Google Assistant in Chrome shares back to Google the website’s URL to validate that the webpage is allowed to be automated by Google Assistant in Chrome and to receive the instructions on how to complete the task (e.g. on how to fill out a form).

At the time the command you issued is executed, additional information can be shared. Depending on the command you issued, the information shared with Google can include the address of the website you are viewing, your email address, your name, your delivery and billing address, your credit card information, and possibly the username you use to log into the website. With the exception of email and credit card network (i.e. Visa, MasterCard, AMEX, etc.), this information is not stored by Google — rather, this information is passed on to the third party website to complete the command you issued to the Google Assistant.

To personalize future actions Google Assistant in Chrome will save configuration information about the command you issued to improve your future experiences (for example: seat selections, number and types of movie tickets, etc.). This information is saved to your Google Account.

Some Google Assistant features are not available on Incognito tabs. You can turn off the ability to use the Google Assistant in Chrome on your Android device by toggling the “Google Assistant for Chrome” option in Chrome’s settings.

Google Cloud Print

The Google Cloud Print feature allows you to print documents from your browser over the Internet. You do not need a direct connection between the machine that executes Chrome and your printer.

If you choose to print a web page via Cloud Print, Chrome will generate a PDF of this website and upload it over an encrypted network connection to Google’s servers. If you choose to print other kinds of documents, they may be uploaded as raw documents to Google’s servers.

A print job will be downloaded by either a Chrome browser (“Connector”) or a Cloud Print capable printer that you selected when printing the website. In some cases the print job must be submitted to a third-party service to print (HP’s ePrint, for example).

The print job is deleted from Google’s servers when any of three criteria is met:

  • You delete the print job
  • The job has been printed and marked as printed by the printer/connector
  • The job has been queued on Google’s servers for 30 days

You can manage your printers and print jobs on the Google Cloud Print website.

SSL certificate reporting

Chrome stores locally a list of expected SSL certificate information for a variety of high-value websites, in an effort to prevent man-in-the-middle attacks. For Google websites and other websites that choose to opt in, Chrome will report a possible attack or misconfiguration. If the certificate provided by the web server doesn’t match the expected signature, Chrome reports information about the SSL certificate chain to Google or to a report collection endpoint of the website's choosing. Chrome sends these reports only for certificate chains that use a public root of trust.

You can enable this feature by opting in to report data relevant to security, as described in the Safe Browsing section. While you are opted in, two kinds of reports may be sent to Google’s security team. Each time you see an SSL error page, a report will be sent containsing the SSL certificate chain, the server's hostname, the local time, and relevant details about the validation error and SSL error page type. Additionally, each time a mismatch between different certificate verifiers is detected, a report will be sent containing the certificate chain and the verification result.

Because Chrome sends these reports for all certificate chains, even those that chain to a private root of trust, these chains can contain personally identifiable information. You can opt out anytime by unchecking the box “Help Improve Chrome security” in “Privacy and security > Security”.

The SSL certificate reporting feature is not available on Chrome iOS.

Installed Applications and Extensions

Users can install external apps and extensions for the desktop versions of Chrome to add features to or customize their Chrome browsers. Installing an application or extension from the Chrome Web Store directly or via an inline installation flow on a third-party site involves a request to the Chrome Web Store for details about the application. This request includes cookies, and if you’re logged into Google when you install an application, that installation is recorded as part of your Google account. The store uses this information to recommend applications to you in the future, and in aggregate to evaluate application popularity and usage. As noted above, applications and extensions are updated via Google Update.

As they're more deeply integrated into Chrome, applications and extensions that you choose to install can request access to additional capabilities, enabling functionality that doesn't make sense on the web at large: background notifications or raw socket access, for instance. These additional permissions may change the way your data is collected and shared, as extensions and applications might have access to data regarding the websites you visit, and might be capable of monitoring or modifying your interactions with the web. When installing an application or extension, Chrome may first warn you about certain capabilities. Please do take the time to read and evaluate this warning before proceeding with the installation. Note also that interactions with and data collected by these third-party applications and extensions are governed by their own privacy policies, not Google's privacy policy.

Push messaging

Your device may receive push messages from the backend servers of apps and extensions installed in Chrome, websites that you grant the “notification” permission to, and your default search engine. Disabling push messages from your default search engine is done in the same way as disabling push messages from any site, by visiting the “Notifications” section of “Site settings”.

Push message data is sent over a secure channel from the developer through Google’s infrastructure to Chrome on your device, which can wake up apps, extensions, and websites (including your default search engine) to deliver the message. The developer may end-to-end encrypt the message data, or may send it in a form such that Google servers process it as plain text. Google servers retain up to 4 weeks’ worth of messages to ensure delivery to users even if their devices are offline at the time of the initial pushing.

If the notification permission is set to “granted” for any website (including the default search engine), or you have an app or extension installed that uses push messaging, then Chrome provides the app’s, extension’s, or website’s server with one or more registration tokens that can be used to send messages to the entity (app, extension, or website). Websites you visit in Incognito mode are not allowed to send you push messages and therefore cannot get a registration token.

When you uninstall an app or extension, revoke the notification permission for a website, or clear cookies for a permitted website, its registration token is revoked and will not be reused, even if the same app or extension is re-installed or the same website is re-visited. Registration tokens used by Chrome components such as Sync are revoked once they are no longer in use (for example, when the user disables Sync). When a registration token is revoked, the associated entity on your device stops receiving messages sent from its developer’s server.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
, Google Voice Typing For PC Archives

When you use our services, you’re trusting us with your information. We understand this is a big responsibility and work hard to protect your information and put you in control.

This Privacy Policy is meant to help you understand what information we collect, why we collect it, and how you can update, manage, export, and delete your information.

Effective January 22, 2019 | Archived versions | Download PDF

We build a range of services that help millions of people daily to explore and interact with the world in new ways. Our services include:

  • Google apps, sites, and devices, like Search, YouTube, and Google Home
  • Platforms like the Chrome browser and Android operating system
  • Products that are integrated into third-party apps and sites, like ads and embedded Google Maps

You can use our services in a variety of ways to manage your privacy. For example, you can sign up for a Google Account if you want to create and manage content like emails and photos, or see more relevant search results. And you can use many Google services when you’re signed out or without creating an account at all, like searching on Google or watching YouTube videos. You can also choose to browse the web privately using Chrome in Incognito mode. And across our services, you can adjust your privacy settings to control what we collect and how your information is used.

To help explain things as clearly as possible, we’ve added examples, explanatory videos, and definitions for key terms. And if you have any questions about this Privacy Policy, you can contact us.

We want you to understand the types of information we collect as you use our services

We collect information to provide better services to all our users — from figuring out basic stuff like which language you speak, to more complex things like which ads you’ll find most useful, the people who matter most to you online, or which YouTube videos you might like. The information Google collects, and how that information is used, depends on how you use our services and how you manage your privacy controls.

When you’re not signed in to a Google Account, we store the information we collect with unique identifiers tied to the browser, application, or device you’re using. This helps us do things like maintain your language preferences across browsing sessions.

When you’re signed in, we also collect information that we store with your Google Account, which we treat as personal information.

Things you create or provide to us

When you create a Google Account, you provide us with personal information that includes your name and a password. You can also choose to add a phone number or payment information to your account. Even if you aren’t signed in to a Google Account, you might choose to provide us with information — like an email address to receive updates about our services.

We also collect the content you create, upload, or receive from others when using our services. This includes things like email you write and receive, photos and videos you save, docs and spreadsheets you create, and comments you make on YouTube videos.

Information we collect as you use our services

Your apps, browsers & devices

We collect information about the apps, browsers, and devices you use to access Google services, which helps us provide features like automatic product updates and dimming your screen if your battery runs low.

The information we collect includes unique identifiers, browser type and settings, device type and settings, operating system, mobile network information including carrier name and phone number, and application version number. We also collect information about the interaction of your apps, browsers, and devices with our services, including IP address, crash reports, system activity, and the date, time, and referrer URL of your request.

We collect this information when a Google service on your device contacts our servers — for example, when you install an app from the Play Store or when a service checks for automatic updates. If you’re using an Android device with Google apps, your device periodically contacts Google servers to provide information about your device and connection to our services. This information includes things like your device type, carrier name, crash reports, and which apps you've installed.

Your activity

We collect information about your activity in our services, which we use to do things like recommend a YouTube video you might like. The activity information we collect may include:

If you use our services to make and receive calls or send and receive messages, we may collect telephony log information like your phone number, calling-party number, receiving-party number, forwarding numbers, time and date of calls and messages, duration of calls, routing information, and types of calls.

You can visit your Google Account to find and manage activity information that’s saved in your account.

Go to Google Account

Your location information

We collect information about your location when you use our services, which helps us offer features like driving directions for your weekend getaway or showtimes for movies playing near you.

Your location can be determined with varying degrees of accuracy by:

The types of location data we collect depend in part on your device and account settings. For example, you can turn your Android device’s location on or off using the device’s settings app. You can also turn on Location History if you want to create a private map of where you go with your signed-in devices.


In some circumstances, Google also collects information about you from publicly accessible sources. For example, if your name appears in your local newspaper, Google’s Search engine may index that article and display it to other people if they search for your name. We may also collect information about you from trusted partners, including marketing partners who provide us with information about potential customers of our business services, and security partners who provide us with information to protect against abuse. We also receive information from advertisers to provide advertising and research services on their behalf.

We use various technologies to collect and store information, including cookies, pixel tags, local storage, such as browser web storage or application data caches, databases, and server logs.

We use data to build better services

We use the information we collect from all our services for the following purposes:

Provide our services

We use your information to deliver our services, like processing the terms you search for in order to return results or helping you share content by suggesting recipients from your contacts.

Maintain & improve our services

We also use your information to ensure our services are working as intended, such as tracking outages or troubleshooting issues that you report to us. And we use your information to make improvements to our services — for example, understanding which search terms are most frequently misspelled helps us improve spell-check features used across our services.

Develop new services

We use the information we collect in existing services to help us develop new ones. For example, understanding how people organized their photos in Picasa, Google’s first photos app, helped us design and launch Google Photos.

Provide personalized services, including content and ads

We use the information we collect to customize our services for you, including providing recommendations, personalized content, and customized search results. For example, Security Checkup provides security tips adapted to how you use Google products. And Google Play uses information like apps you’ve already installed and videos you’ve watched on YouTube to suggest new apps you might like.

Depending on your settings, we may also show you personalized ads based on your interests. For example, if you search for “mountain bikes,” you may see an ad for sports equipment when you’re browsing a site that shows ads served by Google. You can control what information we use to show you ads by visiting your ad settings.

  • We don’t show you personalized ads based on sensitive categories, such as race, religion, sexual orientation, or health.
  • We don’t share information that personally identifies you with advertisers, such as your name or email, unless you ask us to. For example, if you see an ad for a nearby flower shop and select the “tap to call” button, we’ll connect your call and may share your phone number with the flower shop.

Go to Ad Settings

Measure performance

We use data for analytics and measurement to understand how our services are used. For example, we analyze data about your visits to our sites to do things like optimize product design. And we also use data about the ads you interact with to help advertisers understand the performance of their ad campaigns. We use a variety of tools to do this, including Google Analytics. When you visit sites that use Google Analytics, Google and a Google Analytics customer may link information about your activity from that site with activity from other sites that use our ad services.

Communicate with you

We use information we collect, like your email address, to interact with you directly. For example, we may send you a notification if we detect suspicious activity, like an attempt to sign in to your Google Account from an unusual location. Or we may let you know about upcoming changes or improvements to our services. And if you contact Google, we’ll keep a record of your request in order to help solve any issues you might be facing.

Protect Google, our users, and the public

We use information to help improve the safety and reliability of our services. This includes detecting, preventing, and responding to fraud, abuse, security risks, and technical issues that could harm Google, our users, or the public.


We use different technologies to process your information for these purposes. We use automated systems that analyze your content to provide you with things like customized search results, personalized ads, or other features tailored to how you use our services. And we analyze your content to help us detect abuse such as spam, malware, and illegal content. We also use algorithms to recognize patterns in data. For example, Google Translate helps people communicate across languages by detecting common language patterns in phrases you ask it to translate.

We may combine the information we collect among our services and across your devices for the purposes described above. For example, if you watch videos of guitar players on YouTube, you might see an ad for guitar lessons on a site that uses our ad products. Depending on your account settings, your activity on other sites and apps may be associated with your personal information in order to improve Google’s services and the ads delivered by Google.

If other users already have your email address or other information that identifies you, we may show them your publicly visible Google Account information, such as your name and photo. This helps people identify an email coming from you, for example.

We’ll ask for your consent before using your information for a purpose that isn’t covered in this Privacy Policy.

You have choices regarding the information we collect and how it's used

This section describes key controls for managing your privacy across our services. You can also visit the Privacy Checkup, which provides an opportunity to review and adjust important privacy settings. In addition to these tools, we also offer specific privacy settings in our products — you can learn more in our Product Privacy Guide.

Go to Privacy Checkup

Managing, reviewing, and updating your information

When you’re signed in, you can always review and update information by visiting the services you use. For example, Photos and Drive are both designed to help you manage specific types of content you’ve saved with Google.

We also built a place for you to review and control information saved in your Google Account. Your Google Account includes:

Privacy controls

Activity Controls

Decide what types of activity you’d like saved in your account. For example, you can turn on Location History if you want traffic predictions for your daily commute, or you can save your YouTube Watch History to get better video suggestions.

Go to Activity Controls

Ad settings

Manage your preferences about the ads shown to you on Google and on sites and apps that partner with Google to show ads. You can modify your interests, choose whether your personal information is used to make ads more relevant to you, and turn on or off certain advertising services.

Go to Ad Settings

About you

Control what others see about you across Google services.

Go to About You

Shared endorsements

Choose whether your name and photo appear next to your activity, like reviews and recommendations, that appear in ads.

Go to Shared Endorsements

Information you share

Control whom you share information with through your account on Google+.

Go to Information You Share

Ways to review & update your information

My Activity

My Activity allows you to review and control data that’s created when you use Google services, like searches you’ve done or your visits to Google Play. You can browse by date and by topic, and delete part or all of your activity.

Go to My Activity

Google Dashboard

Google Dashboard allows you to manage information associated with specific products.

Go to Dashboard

Your personal information

Manage your contact information, such as your name, email, and phone number.

Go to Personal Info

When you’re signed out, you can manage information associated with your browser or device, including:

  • Signed-out search personalization: Choose whether your search activity is used to offer you more relevant results and recommendations.
  • YouTube settings: Pause and delete your YouTube Search History and your YouTube Watch History.
  • Ad Settings: Manage your preferences about the ads shown to you on Google and on sites and apps that partner with Google to show ads.

Exporting, removing & deleting your information

You can export a copy of content in your Google Account if you want to back it up or use it with a service outside of Google.

Export your data

You can also request to remove content from specific Google services based on applicable law.

To delete your information, you can:

Delete your information

And finally, Inactive Account Manager allows you to give someone else access to parts of your Google Account in case you’re unexpectedly unable to use your account.


There are other ways to control the information Google collects whether or not you’re signed in to a Google Account, including:

  • Browser settings: For example, you can configure your browser to indicate when Google has set a cookie in your browser. You can also configure your browser to block all cookies from a specific domain or all domains. But remember that our services rely on cookies to function properly, for things like remembering your language preferences.
  • Device-level settings: Your device may have controls that determine what information we collect. For example, you can modify location settings on your Android device.

When you share your information

Many of our services let you share information with other people, and you have control over how you share. For example, you can share videos on YouTube publicly or you can decide to keep your videos private. Remember, when you share information publicly, your content may become accessible through search engines, including Google Search.

When you’re signed in and interact with some Google services, like leaving comments on a YouTube video or reviewing a song in Play, your name and photo appear next to your activity. We may also display this information in ads depending on your Shared endorsements setting.

When Google shares your information

We do not share your personal information with companies, organizations, or individuals outside of Google except in the following cases:

With your consent

We’ll share personal information outside of Google when we have your consent. For example, if you use Google Home to make a reservation through a booking service, we’ll get your permission before sharing your name or phone number with the restaurant. We’ll ask for your explicit consent to share any sensitive personal information.

With domain administrators

If you’re a student or work for an organization that uses Google services (like G Suite), your domain administrator and resellers who manage your account will have access to your Google Account. They may be able to:

  • Access and retain information stored in your account, like your email
  • View statistics regarding your account, like how many apps you install
  • Change your account password
  • Suspend or terminate your account access
  • Receive your account information in order to satisfy applicable law, regulation, legal process, or enforceable governmental request
  • Restrict your ability to delete or edit your information or your privacy settings

For external processing

We provide personal information to our affiliates and other trusted businesses or persons to process it for us, based on our instructions and in compliance with our Privacy Policy and any other appropriate confidentiality and security measures. For example, we use service providers to help us with customer support.

For legal reasons

We will share personal information outside of Google if we have a good-faith belief that access, use, preservation, or disclosure of the information is reasonably necessary to:

  • Meet any applicable law, regulation, legal process, or enforceable governmental request. We share information about the number and type of requests we receive from governments in our Transparency Report.
  • Enforce applicable Terms of Service, including investigation of potential violations.
  • Detect, prevent, or otherwise address fraud, security, or technical issues.
  • Protect against harm to the rights, property or safety of Google, our users, or the public as required or permitted by law.

We may share non-personally identifiable information publicly and with our partners — like publishers, advertisers, developers, or rights holders. For example, we share information publicly to show trends about the general use of our services. We also allow specific partners to collect information from your browser or device for advertising and measurement purposes using their own cookies or similar technologies.

If Google is involved in a merger, acquisition, or sale of assets, we’ll continue to ensure the confidentiality of your personal information and give affected users notice before personal information is transferred or becomes subject to a different privacy policy.

We build security into our services to protect your information

All Google products are built with strong security features that continuously protect your information. The insights we gain from maintaining our services help us detect and automatically block security threats from ever reaching you. And if we do detect something risky that we think you should know about, we’ll notify you and help guide you through steps to stay better protected.

We work hard to protect you and Google from unauthorized access, alteration, disclosure, or destruction of information we hold, including:

  • We use encryption to keep your data private while in transit
  • We offer a range of security features, like Safe Browsing, Security Checkup, and 2 Step Verification to help you protect your account
  • We review our information collection, storage, and processing practices, including physical security measures, to prevent unauthorized access to our systems
  • We restrict access to personal information to Google employees, contractors, and agents who need that information in order to process it. Anyone with this access is subject to strict contractual confidentiality obligations and may be disciplined or terminated if they fail to meet these obligations.

You can export a copy of your information or delete it from your Google Account at any time

You can export a copy of content in your Google Account if you want to back it up or use it with a service outside of Google.

Export your data

To delete your information, you can:

Delete your information

In some cases, we retain data for limited periods when it needs to be kept for legitimate business or legal purposes. You can read about Google’s data retention periods, including how long it takes us to delete your information.

We try to ensure that our services protect information from accidental or malicious deletion. Because of this, there may be delays between when you delete something and when copies are deleted from our active and backup systems.

We regularly review this Privacy Policy and make sure that we process your information in ways that comply with it.

Data transfers

We maintain servers around the world and your information may be processed on servers located outside of the country where you live. Data protection laws vary among countries, with some providing more protection than others. Regardless of where your information is processed, we apply the same protections described in this policy. We also comply with certain legal frameworks relating to the transfer of data, such as the EU-US and Swiss-US Privacy Shield Frameworks.

When we receive formal written complaints, we respond by contacting the person who made the complaint. We work with the appropriate regulatory authorities, including local data protection authorities, to resolve any complaints regarding the transfer of your data that we cannot resolve with you directly.

When this policy applies

This Privacy Policy applies to all of the services offered by Google LLC and its affiliates, including YouTube, Android, and services offered on third-party sites, such as advertising services. This Privacy Policy doesn’t apply to services that have separate privacy policies that do not incorporate this Privacy Policy.

This Privacy Policy doesn’t apply to:

  • The information practices of other companies and organizations that advertise our services
  • Services offered by other companies or individuals, including products or sites that may include Google services, be displayed to you in search results, or be linked from our services

Changes to this policy

We change this Privacy Policy from time to time. We will not reduce your rights under this Privacy Policy without your explicit consent. We always indicate the date the last changes were published and we offer access to archived versions for your review. If changes are significant, we’ll provide a more prominent notice (including, for certain services, email notification of Privacy Policy changes).

Specific Google services

The following privacy notices provide additional information about some Google services:

Other useful resources

The following links highlight useful resources for you to learn more about our practices and privacy settings.

ads you’ll find most useful

For example, if you watch videos about baking on YouTube, you may see more ads that relate to baking as you browse the web. We also may use your IP address to determine your approximate location, so that we can serve you ads for a nearby pizza delivery service if you search for “pizza.” Learn more about Google ads and why you may see particular ads.

the people who matter most to you online

For example, when you type an address in the To, Cc, or Bcc field of an email you're composing, Gmail will suggest addresses based on the people you contact most frequently.

phone number

If you add your phone number to your account, it can be used for different purposes across Google services, depending on your settings. For example, your phone number can be used to help you access your account if you forget your password, help people find and connect with you, and make the ads you see more relevant to you. Learn more

payment information

For example, if you add a credit card or other payment method to your Google Account, you can use it to buy things across our services, like apps in the Play Store. We may also ask for other information, like a business tax ID, to help process your payment. In some cases, we may also need to verify your identity and may ask you for information to do this.

We may also use payment information to verify that you meet age requirements, if, for example, you enter an incorrect birthday indicating you’re not old enough to have a Google Account. Learn more

devices

For example, we can use information from your devices to help you decide which device you’d like to use to install an app or view a movie you buy from Google Play. We also use this information to help protect your account.

Android device with Google apps

Android devices with Google apps include devices sold by Google or one of our partners and include phones, cameras, vehicles, wearables, and televisions. These devices use Google Play Services and other pre-installed apps that include services like Gmail, Maps, your phone’s camera and phone dialer, text-to-speech conversion, keyboard input, and security features.

Views and interactions with content and ads

For example, we collect information about views and interactions with ads so we can provide aggregated reports to advertisers, like telling them whether we served their ad on a page and whether the ad was likely seen by a viewer. We may also measure other interactions, such as how you move your mouse over an ad or if you interact with the page on which the ad appears.

synced with your Google Account

Your Chrome browsing history is only saved to your account if you’ve enabled Chrome synchronization with your Google Account. Learn more

services to make and receive calls or send and receive messages

Examples of these services include:

  • Google Hangouts, for making domestic and international calls
  • Google Voice, for making calls, sending text messages, and managing voicemail
  • Google Fi, for a phone plan

Sensor data from your device

Your device may have sensors that can be used to better understand your location and movement. For example, an accelerometer can be used to determine your speed and a gyroscope to figure out your direction of travel.

Information about things near your device

If you use Google’s Location services on Android, we can improve the performance of apps that rely on your location, like Google Maps. If you use Google’s Location services, your device sends information to Google about its location, sensors (like accelerometer), and nearby cell towers and Wi-Fi access points (like MAC address and signal strength). All these things help to determine your location. You can use your device settings to enable Google Location services. Learn more

publicly accessible sources

For example, we may collect information that’s publicly available online or from other public sources to help train Google’s language models and build features like Google Translate.

protect against abuse

For example, information about security threats can help us notify you if we think your account has been compromised (at which point we can help you take steps to protect your account).

advertising and research services on their behalf

For example, advertisers may upload data from their loyalty-card programs so that they can better understand the performance of their ad campaigns. We only provide aggregated reports to advertisers that don’t reveal information about individual people.

deliver our services

Examples of how we use your information to deliver our services include:

  • We use the IP address assigned to your device to send you the data you requested, such as loading a YouTube video
  • We use unique identifiers stored in cookies on your device to help us authenticate you as the person who should have access to your Google Account
  • Photos and videos you upload to Google Photos are used to help you create albums, animations, and other creations that you can share. Learn more
  • A flight confirmation email you receive may be used to create a “check-in” button that appears in your Gmail
  • When you purchase services or physical goods from us, you may provide us information like your shipping address or delivery instructions. We use this information for things like processing, fulfilling, and delivering your order, and to provide support in connection with the product or service you purchase.

ensure our services are working as intended

For example, we continuously monitor our systems to look for problems. And if we find something wrong with a specific feature, reviewing activity information collected before the problem started allows us to fix things more quickly.

make improvements

For example, we use cookies to analyze how people interact with our services. And that analysis can help us build better products. For example, it may help us discover that it’s taking people too long to complete a certain task or that they have trouble finishing steps at all. We can then redesign that feature and improve the product for everyone.

customized search results

For example, when you’re signed in to your Google Account and have the Web & App Activity control enabled, you can get more relevant search results that are based on your previous searches and activity from other Google services. You can learn more here. You may also get customized search results even when you’re signed out. If you don’t want this level of search customization, you can search and browse privately or turn off signed-out search personalization.

personalized ads

You may also see personalized ads based on information from the advertiser. If you shopped on an advertiser's website, for example, they can use that visit information to show you ads. Learn more

sensitive categories

When showing you personalized ads, we use topics that we think might be of interest to you based on your activity. For example, you may see ads for things like "Cooking and Recipes" or "Air Travel.” We don’t use topics or show personalized ads based on sensitive categories like race, religion, sexual orientation, or health. And we require the same from advertisers that use our services.

may link information

Google Analytics relies on first-party cookies, which means the cookies are set by the Google Analytics customer. Using our systems, data generated through Google Analytics can be linked by the Google Analytics customer and by Google to third-party cookies that are related to visits to other websites. For example, an advertiser may want to use its Google Analytics data to create more relevant ads, or to further analyze its traffic. Learn more

safety and reliability

Some examples of how we use your information to help keep our services safe and reliable include:

  • Collecting and analyzing IP addresses and cookie data to protect against automated abuse. This abuse takes many forms, such as sending spam to Gmail users, stealing money from advertisers by fraudulently clicking on ads, or censoring content by launching a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack.
  • The “last account activity” feature in Gmail can help you find out if and when someone accessed your email without your knowledge. This feature shows you information about recent activity in Gmail, such as the IP addresses that accessed your mail, the associated location, and the date and time of access. Learn more

detect abuse

When we detect spam, malware, illegal content, and other forms of abuse on our systems in violation of our policies, we may disable your account or take other appropriate action. In certain circumstances, we may also report the violation to appropriate authorities.

combine the information we collect

Some examples of how we combine the information we collect include:

  • When you’re signed in to your Google Account and search on Google, you can see search results from the public web, along with relevant information from the content you have in other Google products, like Gmail or Google Calendar. This can include things like the status of your upcoming flights, restaurant, and hotel reservations, or your photos. Learn more
  • If you have communicated with someone via Gmail and want to add them to a Google Doc or an event in Google Calendar, Google makes it easy to do so by autocompleting their email address when you start to type in their name. This feature makes it easier to share things with people you know. Learn more
  • The Google app can use data that you have stored in other Google products to show you personalized content, depending on your settings. For example, if you have searches stored in your Web & App Activity, the Google app can show you news articles and other information about your interests, like sports scores, based your activity. Learn more
  • If you link your Google Account to your Google Home, you can manage your information and get things done through the Google Assistant. For example, you can add events to your Google Calendar or get your schedule for the day, ask for status updates on your upcoming flight, or send information like driving directions to your phone. Learn more

your activity on other sites and apps

This activity might come from your use of Google services, like from syncing your account with Chrome or your visits to sites and apps that partner with Google. Many websites and apps partner with Google to improve their content and services. For example, a website might use our advertising services (like AdSense) or analytics tools (like Google Analytics), or it might embed other content (such as videos from YouTube). These services may share information about your activity with Google and, depending on your account settings and the products in use (for instance, when a partner uses Google Analytics in conjunction with our advertising services), this data may be associated with your personal information.

Learn more about how Google uses data when you use our partners' sites or apps.

partner with Google

There are over 2 million non-Google websites and apps that partner with Google to show ads. Learn more

specific Google services

For example, you can delete your blog from Blogger or a Google Site you own from Google Sites. You can also delete reviews you’ve left on apps, games, and other content in the Play Store.

rely on cookies to function properly

For example, we use a cookie called ‘lbcs’ that makes it possible for you to open many Google Docs in one browser. Blocking this cookie would prevent Google Docs from working as expected. Learn more

legal process, or enforceable governmental request

Like other technology and communications companies, Google regularly receives requests from governments and courts around the world to disclose user data. Respect for the privacy and security of data you store with Google underpins our approach to complying with these legal requests. Our legal team reviews each and every request, regardless of type, and we frequently push back when a request appears to be overly broad or doesn’t follow the correct process. Learn more in our Transparency Report.

show trends

When lots of people start searching for something, it can provide useful information about particular trends at that time. Google Trends samples Google web searches to estimate the popularity of searches over a certain period of time and shares those results publicly in aggregated terms. Learn more

specific partners

For example, we allow YouTube creators and advertisers to work with measurement companies to learn about the audience of their YouTube videos or ads, using cookies or similar technologies. Another example is merchants on our shopping pages, who use cookies to understand how many different people see their product listings. Learn more about these partners and how they use your information.

servers around the world

For example, we operate data centers located around the world to help keep our products continuously available for users.

third parties

For example, we process your information to report use statistics to rights holders about how their content was used in our services. We may also process your information if people search for your name and we display search results for sites containing publicly available information about you.

appropriate safeguards

For example, we may anonymize data, or encrypt data to ensure it can’t be linked to other information about you. Learn more

ensure and improve

For example, we analyze how people interact with advertising to improve the performance of our ads.

Customizing our services

For example, we may display a Google Doodle on the Search homepage to celebrate an event specific to your country.

Affiliates

An affiliate is an entity that belongs to the Google group of companies, including the following companies that provide consumer services in the EU: Google Ireland Limited, Google Commerce Ltd, Google Payment Corp, and Google Dialer Inc. Learn more about the companies providing business services in the EU.

Algorithm

A process or set of rules followed by a computer in performing problem-solving operations.

Application data cache

An application data cache is a data repository on a device. It can, for example, enable a web application to run without an internet connection and improve the performance of the application by enabling faster loading of content.

Browser web storage

Browser web storage enables websites to store data in a browser on a device. When used in "local storage" mode, it enables data to be stored across sessions. This makes data retrievable even after a browser has been closed and reopened. One technology that facilitates web storage is HTML 5.

Cookies and similar technologies

A cookie is a small file containing a string of characters that is sent to your computer when you visit a website. When you visit the site again, the cookie allows that site to recognize your browser. Cookies may store user preferences and other information. You can configure your browser to refuse all cookies or to indicate when a cookie is being sent. However, some website features or services may not function properly without cookies. Learn more about how Google uses cookies and how Google uses data, including cookies, when you use our partners' sites or apps.

Device

A device is a computer that can be used to access Google services. For example, desktop computers, tablets, smart speakers, and smartphones are all considered devices.

Non-personally identifiable information

This is information that is recorded about users so that it no longer reflects or references an individually-identifiable user.

IP address

Every device connected to the Internet is assigned a number known as an Internet protocol (IP) address. These numbers are usually assigned in geographic blocks. An IP address can often be used to identify the location from which a device is connecting to the Internet.

Pixel tag

A pixel tag is a type of technology placed on a website or within the body of an email for the purpose of tracking certain activity, such as views of a website or when an email is opened. Pixel tags are often used in combination with cookies.

Personal information

This is information that you provide to us which personally identifies you, such as your name, email address, or billing information, or other data that can be reasonably linked to such information by Google, such as information we associate with your Google Account.

Sensitive personal information

This is a particular category of personal information relating to topics such as confidential medical facts, racial or ethnic origins, political or religious beliefs, or sexuality.

Server logs

Like most websites, our servers automatically record the page requests made when you visit our sites. These “server logs” typically include your web request, Internet Protocol address, browser type, browser language, the date and time of your request, and one or more cookies that may uniquely identify your browser.

A typical log entry for a search for “cars” looks like this:

123.45.67.89 - 25/Mar/2003 10:15:32 -
http://www.google.com/search?q=cars -
Firefox 1.0.7; Windows NT 5.1 -
740674ce2123e969
  • is the Internet Protocol address assigned to the user by the user’s ISP. Depending on the user’s service, a different address may be assigned to the user by their service provider each time they connect to the Internet.
  • is the date and time of the query.
  • is the requested URL, including the search query.
  • is the browser and operating system being used.
  • is the unique cookie ID assigned to this particular computer the first time it visited Google. (Cookies can be deleted by users. If the user has deleted the cookie from the computer since the last time they’ve visited Google, then it will be the unique cookie ID assigned to their device the next time they visit Google from that particular device).

Unique identifiers

A unique identifier is a string of characters that can be used to uniquely identify a browser, app, or device. Different identifiers vary in how permanent they are, whether they can be reset by users, and how they can be accessed.

Unique identifiers can be used for various purposes, including security and fraud detection, syncing services such as your email inbox, remembering your preferences, and providing personalized advertising. For example, unique identifiers stored in cookies help sites display content in your browser in your preferred language. You can configure your browser to refuse all cookies or to indicate when a cookie is being sent. Learn more about how Google uses cookies.

On other platforms besides browsers, unique identifiers are used to recognize a specific device or app on that device. For example, a unique identifier such as the Advertising ID is used to provide relevant advertising on Android devices, and can be managed in your device’s settings. Unique identifiers may also be incorporated into a device by its manufacturer (sometimes called a universally unique ID or UUID), such as the IMEI-number of a mobile phone. For example, a device’s unique identifier can be used to customize our service to your device or analyze device issues related to our services.

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Google Voice Typing For PC Archives

Google Voice Keyboard Shortcuts - Windows

ActionShortcut
Open Quick Call
c
Open Quick SMS
m
Close Quick Call or Quick SMS
Esc
Jump to search box
/
Go to next page
Right arrow or n
Go to previous page
Left arrow or p
Move message(s) to trash
#
Mark message(s) as spam
!
Mark message(s) as read
Shift+i
Mark message(s) as unread
Shift+u
Go to inbox
g then i
Go to starred messages
g then s
Go to history
g then h
Go to placed calls
g then p
Go to received calls
g then r
Go to missed calls
g then m
Go to contacts
g then c
Go to unread messages
g then u
Select all
* then a
Select none
* then n
Select read
* then r
Select unread
* then u

Your Input

Please use the form below to ask questions about topics that are not covered here, or to send new or corrected information:

Accessibility feedback


Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
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