For Honor the eighth biggest game in Steam history Archives

For Honor the eighth biggest game in Steam history Archives

For Honor the eighth biggest game in Steam history Archives

For Honor the eighth biggest game in Steam history Archives

Naval History and Heritage Command

On 15 September 1950, landing ships and transports began disembarking the 1st Marine Division at Inchon for Operation Chromite, the first major armed conflict of the Cold War.
Starting on 10 September 1945, Operation Magic Carpet began repatriating more than eight million military men and women after WWII.
Information
For the Fleet
Information
For the Fleet
Commonly Requested Information on Fleet Issues
Resources for
Navy Veterans
Resources for
Navy Veterans
Locate records related to military service, photos, deck logs, ship histories, and more.
1895 - The battleship USS Maine is commissioned. Almost three years later, on Feb. 15, 1898, the battleship was sunk by an explosion that killed a majority of her crew.
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
, For Honor the eighth biggest game in Steam history Archives

From the archives: The 1960s in the Lynchburg area

From the archives: The 1960s in the Lynchburg area
From the The Decades Series: Photos of the Lynchburg area from the '50s, '60s, '70s and more series

Our photo archives from the 1960s hold hundreds of images that capture the turbulence, change and growth that marked the decade in the Lynchburg area. Downtown protests to integrate segregated lunch counters. Martin Luther King Jr.'s visit to the Hill City in 1962, the same year all-white E.C. Glass High School was integrated by the arrival of two black students, Lynda Woodruff and Owen Cardwell. Growth away from downtown accelerated with the opening of Pittman Plaza and Boonsboro shopping centers, and Central Virginia Community College staked out a place along U.S. 29. Other noteworthy construction projects from the 1960s included the creation of the Smith Mountain Lake project, a new terminal at the Lynchburg airport, a new Brookville High School and the opening of Thomas Road Baptist Church. 

MORE: 1950s | 1970s | 1980s | 1990s | 2010s | Archives

1960 Virginian

1960-02-23 Core goes critical

1960 Waiting in Line

1960 Soap Box Derby

1960 Main Street

1960-03-21 NAACP Meets, Hears Lunch Counter Proposals

1960-04-01 Flooding

1960-04-09 NAACP Pickets Store

1960-04-15 Lynchburg Community Market

1960-06-29 Pittman Plaza

1960-09-01 Question time

1960-10-19 Smith Mountain Gap

1960-10-27 Homecoming

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
For Honor the eighth biggest game in Steam history Archives

Coronavirus Blog Archive

– 5:08 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 6, 2020

San Diego County public health officials reported 308 new COVID-19 cases and three additional deaths Sunday, raising the county's cumulative totals to 40,650 cases and 707 fatalities.

Two women and one man died between July 29 and Aug. 31. Their ages ranged from the mid-50s to mid-90s. Two of the three had underlying medical conditions.

San Diego County's state-calculated case rate is 5.8 and the testing positivity percentage is 3.8%.

Of 4,271 tests reported as of Saturday, 7% returned positive, raising the county's 14-day rolling positive testing rate to 4.3%, well below the state's 8% guideline. The seven-day average number of tests performed in the county is 6,946.

Of the total positive cases in the county, 3,214 — or 7.9% — have required hospitalization since the pandemic began, and 772 — or 1.9% — were admitted to an intensive care unit.

County health officials reported two new community outbreaks as of Saturday, bringing the number of outbreaks in the past week to 20. One of the outbreaks was at a residence and one at a business. – City News Service

San Diego County Passes 40k COVID-19 Cases, 704 Deaths

– 8:29 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 6, 2020

San Diego County public health officials have reported 443 new COVID-19 cases and three additional deaths from the illness, raising the county's cumulative tally to 40,342 cases and 704 fatalities.

Two women and a man died between July 29 and Sept 3. Their ages ranged from early 70s to early 80s. All three had underlying medical conditions.

San Diego County's state-calculated case rate is 5.8 and the testing positivity percentage is 3.8%.

Of 7,445 tests reported Friday, 6% returned positive, raising the county's 14-day rolling positive testing rate to 4.2%, well below the state's 8% guideline. The seven-day average number of tests performed in the county is 7,102.

Of the total positive cases in the county, 3,199 — or 7.9% — have required hospitalization since the pandemic began, and 768 — or 1.9% — were admitted to an intensive care unit. – City News Service

San Diego State University Reports 120 More Students With COVID-19

– 4:44 p.m., Friday, Sept. 4, 2020

an Diego State University reported another 120 confirmed or probable COVID-19 cases among its student population Friday, raising the university's total caseload to 184 since fall semester began Aug. 24.

Additionally, San Diego County public health officials confirmed multiple clusters of COVID-19 cases within the university community among students. This includes the previously announced off-campus outbreak on Wednesday. SDSU officials say none of the cases under investigation are related to on-campus educational activities, including classes or labs.

Luke Wood, SDSU's vice president for student affairs and campus diversity, said the university was working with a security company to enforce public health code violations and had issued a total of 457 student violations through Friday afternoon. Wood said the most serious of these violations could result in suspension or expulsion from the university. Some organizations have been cited as well. Wood said the majority of these were fraternities or sororities, but followed up that not all were, and outbreaks impact the community at large regardless of the type of group they occurred in.

All of the university's in-person classes — which SDSU President Adela de la Torre said comprised just 7% of all courses — were moved online Wednesday. SDSU also paused all on-campus athletics training and workouts for two weeks starting Thursday due to COVID-19. – City News Service

2 New Coronavirus Community Outbreaks Reported Thursday

– 3:45 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 3, 2020

San Diego County public health officials Thursday reported 325 new COVID-19 cases and five additional deaths from the illness, raising the county's cumulative totals to 39,446 cases and 700 deaths.

Five men died between Aug. 1 and 31, and their ages ranged from mid-40s to early 90s. All had underlying medical conditions.

Of 9,031 tests reported Thursday, 4% returned positive, maintaining the county's 14-day rolling positive testing rate at 3.8%, well below the state's 8% guideline. The seven-day average number of tests performed in the county is 7,190.

Of the total positive cases in the county, 3,169 — or 8% — have required hospitalization since the pandemic began, and 767 — or 1.9% — were admitted to an intensive care unit.

County health officials reported two new community outbreaks Thursday, bringing the number of outbreaks in the past week to 17. The outbreaks were in a business and a restaurant/bar setting.

The number of community outbreaks remains well above the county's goal of fewer than seven in a seven-day span. A community setting outbreak is defined as three or more COVID-19 cases in a setting and in people of different households in the past 14 days. — City News Service

Carlsbad Suspends Fees For Outdoor Permits During COVID-19 Pandemic

– 12:20 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 3, 2020

The city of Carlsbad announced Thursday it was temporarily suspending its collection fees for sidewalk cafes, outdoor displays and curbside cafe permits to help businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

This suspension of permit fees also means reimbursement of around $8,000 to businesses that paid for these types of permits since March 1 of this year. Fee reimbursement and the revenue offset from the suspension of fee collection will be funded from the Economic Recovery and Revitalization Initiative funds. Of those funds, $175,000 remains for contingency or future city council actions.

When the pandemic's public health orders required the closure of indoor operations, Carlsbad relaxed development standards to allow businesses to use these permits to quickly activate outdoor spaces on public sidewalks. Some businesses were also granted no-cost permits allowing them to use private property such as their parking lots, to add to their existing outdoor areas. – City News Service

Three New COVID-19 Community Outbreaks Reported In San Diego

– 4:15 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020

Of 7,606 tests reported Wednesday, 3% returned positive, bringing the county's 14-day rolling positive testing rate to 3.8%, well below the state's 8% guideline. The seven-day average number of tests performed in the county is 6,648.

Of the total positive cases in the county, 3,142 — or 8% — have required hospitalization since the pandemic began, and 760 — or 1.9% — were admitted to an intensive care unit.

County health officials reported three new community outbreaks Wednesday, bringing the number of outbreaks in the past week to 18. Two of the outbreaks were in restaurant/bar settings and the third was in a private residence.

The number of community outbreaks remains well above the county's goal of fewer than seven in a seven-day span. A community setting outbreak is defined as three or more COVID-19 cases in a setting and in people of different households in the past 14 days.

San Diego County Supervisor Nathan Fletcher cautioned residents to take the illness seriously over the coming holiday weekend, and to avoid house parties and other large gatherings.

"One of the most dangerous setting is an indoor setting," he said. "The actions we take moving forward will impact our trajectory going forward." — City News Service

UC San Diego Joins Second National Clinical Trial For COVID-19

– 1:47 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020

UC San Diego Health announced today it will join a second, national clinical trial to develop a vaccine designed to protect against SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, by the end of the year.

Like the Moderna clinical trial, which launched in late July, the Phase III national AstraZeneca study will recruit up to 30,000 participants at multiple sites across the country.

The trial arm at UC San Diego will involve an estimated 1,600 participants, with particular outreach intended for underserved communities, and has a scheduled Sept. 8 start date.

UCSD researchers are collaborating with El Centro Regional Medical Center in the Imperial Valley, which has been hard-hit by the pandemic, to create a sub-site of the trial. – City News Service

San Diego Symphony Cancels Rest Of 2020 Schedule, Looks To 2021

– 4:51 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2020

The San Diego Symphony canceled the remainder of its 2020 season Tuesday as COVID-19-related closures drag on, with some performances canceled through May 2021.

All Jacobs Masterworks concerts at Copley Symphony Hall at Jacobs Music Center have been canceled through Dec. 31. In addition, all special concerts and all concerts in the Broadway at the Jacobs, Jazz at the Jacobs, Fox Film and Family concert series have been canceled through May 2021.

As a result of the cancellations and to simplify the ticketing process, the company will automatically move any 2020/21 subscription into the 2021/22 season. Symphony staff plans to share details of the 2021/22 season programming in April 2021.

"While our venues — Copley Symphony Hall at Jacobs Music Center, and The Shell — remain closed, we continue to connect with our audiences and each other through a variety of digital programs and the sharing of socially distanced performances by our musicians on social media," a statement on the symphony's social media read. – City News Service

San Diego Superior Court Summoning Jurors Again, Trial Slated For Next Month

– 4:11 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2020

Following about six months without jury trials due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the San Diego Superior Court announced Tuesday that it has begun summoning jurors again in anticipation of trials resuming next month.

Jury duty summons were mailed out this week calling for prospective panelists to appear at the downtown San Diego courthouse beginning Oct. 9.

While one murder trial interrupted by the pandemic was completed while San Diego County courthouses were closed to the general public, a criminal trial slated to begin Oct. 13 will be the first to commence following the court closures.

Most other court proceedings have been conducted via video- conferencing during the pandemic, but the courts have grappled with the logistical and safety issues involved with inviting large numbers of people into the courthouses to report for jury duty, leading to a burgeoning backlog of criminal trials since the courthouses were shuttered mid-March. – City News Service

San Diego County Reports 267 New Coronavirus Cases, 6 Deaths Tuesday

– 3:45 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2020

County health officials on Tuesday reported 267 new COVID-19 cases and six additional deaths Tuesday, raising the region's totals to 38,871 cases and 688 deaths.

Four women and two men died, and their ages ranged from the late 40s to the late 80s. All had underlying medical conditions.

Of 6,986 tests reported Tuesday, 4% returned positive, raising the county's 14-day rolling positive testing rate to 3.7%, well below the state's 8% guideline. The seven-day average number of tests performed in the county is 6,751.

Of the total positive cases in the county, 3,125 — or 8% — have required hospitalization since the pandemic began, and 755 — or 1.9% — were admitted to an intensive care unit.

County health officials reported one new community outbreak Tuesday, bringing the number of outbreaks in the past week to 16. The outbreak was in a restaurant/bar setting. — City News Service

County Reports 304 New COVID-19 Cases Monday

– 4:35 p.m., Monday, Aug. 31, 2020

San Diego County public health officials reported 304 new COVID-19 cases Monday, raising the county's cumulative cases to 38,604 while multiple industries reopened some indoor operations under new state guidelines.

No new deaths were reported, keeping the county's deaths tied to the illness at 682. Of 5,731 tests reported Monday, 5% returned positive, raising the county's 14-day rolling positive testing rate to 3.7%, well below the state's 8% guideline. The seven-day average number of tests performed in the county is 6,543.

Businesses including movie theaters, gyms, museums and hair and nail salons resumed indoor operations Monday, with modifications, under newly issued state guidance. Restaurants, places of worship and movie theaters are only allowed up to 25% occupancy or 100 people — whichever is less. Museums, zoos and aquariums are also required not to exceed 25% occupancy.

The county will put in place Monday night a new policy that restaurant patrons sitting indoors must wear masks at all times, except when actively eating or drinking. Outdoor patrons may still remove masks while not consuming food or beverages.

Gyms, dance studios, yoga studios and fitness centers may operate with 10% occupancy. Hair salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, piercing shops, skin care and cosmetology services and nail salons may operate indoors with normal capacity, however, a new policy states they must keep an appointment book with names and contact information for customers to track potential future outbreaks.

San Diego County Supervisor Greg Cox thanked San Diegans for working hard to bring the case rate down but offered a word of measured caution on Monday.

"This is not a green light, this is a yellow light," he said. "We can't gun the engine of the economy full throttle yet." — City News Service

13 San Diego State Students Test Positive For COVID-19

– 3:30 p.m., Monday, Aug. 31, 2020

San Diego State University reported another 13 students who have tested positive for COVID-19 Monday, a week after school begins.

Those 13 students, some of whom live in campus housing, join seven other students who tested positive for the illness last week. None of the students have attended any in-person classes.

An SDSU statement said the university had taken direct action with the students who live in university-owned housing.

"Three of the cases live on-campus at Zapotec, Villa Alvarado Apartments and South Campus Plaza North," the statement said. "Two on-campus students have been moved to a designated isolation room, per SDSU's Office of Housing Administration COVID-19 protocol. The other student was already isolating away from campus, prior to seeking testing this weekend. All are recovering well."

A total of 31 SDSU students have contracted COVID-19 since March. — City News Service

San Diego Mayor Delays Parking Enforcement Again To October

– 12:30 p.m., Monday, Aug. 31, 2020

San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer announced Monday he has directed city staff to delay full enforcement of parking regulations until Oct. 1, to provide more support for residents impacted by COVID-19.

Parking enforcement has been limited to holiday or Sunday regulations in San Diego since March 16. During that time, the city has suspended citations for vehicles violating street sweeping parking restrictions, metered parking, time limits and yellow commercial zones. Citations have continued to be issued for vehicles parked illegally at red, white and blue painted curbs.

Previously, restrictions had been scheduled to return on July 1, Aug. 1 and Sept. 1, but the ongoing pandemic has prompted a delay each time.

According to Faulconer's office, before March the city processed an average of 42,000 parking citations per month. In April, the city issued 1,704 parking citations for violations of the holiday or Sunday regulations. — City News Service

San Diego Businesses May Reopen Indoors Operations Monday

– 11:30 a.m., Monday, Aug. 31, 2020

Starting Monday, businesses including movie theaters, gyms, museums and hair and nail salons can resume indoor operations, with modifications, under newly issued state guidance related to the coronavirus pandemic.

Restaurants, places of worship and movie theaters can reopen indoor operations Monday, but are only allowed up to 25% occupancy or 100 people — whichever is less. Museums, zoos and aquariums are also required not to exceed 25% occupancy.

Gyms, dance studios, yoga studios and fitness centers may operate with 10% occupancy. Hair salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, piercing shops, skin care and cosmetology services and nail salons may operate indoors with normal capacity.

But when it comes to retail businesses, Dr. Wilma Wooten, the county's public health officer, said the county would follow state guidelines that they're to be restricted to 50% occupancy.

All indoor businesses must still abide by social distancing- and face- covering mandates, as well as having a detailed safe reopening plan on file with the county.

Gov. Gavin Newsom released a new state system Friday that sorts counties into one of four tiers based on the extent of the area's COVID-19 outbreak.

Wooten said San Diego County had made it to "tier 2," the only county in Southern California to earn that designation. The county still has a "substantial" COVID-19 presence, but unlike Orange, Riverside, Los Angeles and Imperial counties it is not considered "widespread."

The two metrics the state was monitoring in that tier list include an old one — the percentage of positive tests — and a new one — the number of daily new cases per 100,000 people. San Diego County is at 3.7% and 5.8 per 100,000 respectively. To make it to the next tier, the county must show rates of between 2% and 4.9% positive tests and between 1 and 3.9 new daily cases per 100,000 population.

Because the county currently exceeds one of those numbers, it cannot start its path to the next tier. — City News Service

263 New COVID-19 Cases, 3 Deaths Reported In San Diego Saturday

– 5 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 29, 2020

On Saturday, the county reported 263 new COVID-19 cases and three new deaths, raising the region's totals to 38,047 cases and 679 deaths.

Two women in their mid-80s and one man in his early 80s died. All three had underlying medical conditions.

Of the 6,796 tests reported, 4% returned positive. The 14-day rolling average of positive tests is 3.7%, well below the state's 8% guideline. The seven-day average number of tests performed in the county is 6,978.

Of the total positive cases in the county, 3,083 — or 8.1% — have required hospitalization since the pandemic began, and 749 — or 2% — were admitted to an intensive care unit.

County health officials reported six new community outbreaks Friday, bringing the number of outbreaks in the past week to 20. The outbreaks were in a food processing setting and five in business settings.

The number of community outbreaks remains well above the county's goal of fewer than seven in a seven-day span. A community setting outbreak is defined as three or more COVID-19 cases in a setting and in people of different households in the past 14 days. — City News Service

S.D. County To Allow Some Indoor Businesses To Open Monday

– 4:40 p.m., Friday, Aug. 28, 2020

Hours after Gov. Gavin Newsom released a new system for the state that sorts counties into one of four tiers based on the extent of the area's COVID-19 outbreak, San Diego County officials announced some local businesses would be able to operate indoors in a limited capacity starting Monday.

On Aug. 31, restaurants, places of worship, movie theaters and museums will be allowed to maintain up to 25% occupancy or 100 people — whichever is less. Gyms may operate with 10% occupancy. Hair salons, barbershops and nail salons may operate indoors with normal capacity. The impact to retail spaces currently open for indoor operations is unclear, although Dr. Wilma Wooten, the county's public health officer, alluded that they might be restricted to 50% occupancy.

All indoor businesses must still abide by social distancing and face covering mandates, as well as having a detailed safe reopening plan on file with the county.

Wooten said San Diego County had made it to "tier 2," the only county in Southern California to earn that designation. The county still has a "substantial" COVID-19 presence, but unlike Orange, Riverside, Los Angeles and Imperial counties it is not considered "widespread." – City News Service

Newsom Unveils New, More Gradual Reopening Process

– 12:45 p.m, Friday, Aug. 28, 2020

California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Friday a new process for reopening businesses that is slower and more gradual than what the state tried earlier this summer amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The new rules create a four-tier, color-coded system that counties will move through based on their number of cases and percentage of positive tests. It will rely on two metrics to determine which tier a county is in: case rates and the percentage of positive tests.

The new process will put more power with the state instead of the counties.

The new rules come nearly two months after Newsom shut down bars, restaurants for indoor dining and a slew of other businesses following a surge in cases after the state’s first reopening attempt.

Under the new process, counties will have to meet certain metrics for three weeks before they can reopen certain businesses. Newsom didn’t immediately say which businesses will be included in which color tier or what the reopening will look like.

The state will now report virus statistics, such as case numbers, on a weekly basis.

The new approach is aimed at ensuring the state’s cases don’t skyrocket when businesses begin to reopen. — Associated Press

SD County Reports 277 New COVID-19 Cases, Five Deaths

– 3:45 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020

San Diego County public health officials reported 277 new COVID-19 cases and five deaths from the illness Thursday, raising the region's totals to 37,499 cases and 673 deaths.

Three women and two men died between July 28 and Aug. 26, and their ages ranged from their early 40s to their early 90s.

Of the 5,235 tests reported Thursday, 5% returned positive, raising the 14-day rolling average of positive tests to 3.7%, well below the state's 8% guideline. The seven-day average number of tests performed in the county is 6,946.

Of the total positive cases in the county, 3,040 — or 8.1% — have required hospitalization since the pandemic began, and 738 — or 2% — were admitted to an intensive care unit.

The case rate for the county remained under the state's 100 cases per 100,000 population, at 80.6 per 100,000, which means that schools are still on track to be able to open as soon as Sept. 1.

County health officials reported three new community outbreaks on Thursday, bringing the number of outbreaks in the past week to 20. Two outbreaks were reported in businesses, the third in a restaurant.

The number of community outbreaks remains well above the county's goal of fewer than seven in a seven-day span. A community setting outbreak is defined as three or more COVID-19 cases in a setting and in people of different households in the past 14 days. — City News Service

SD County Reports 228 New COVID-19 Cases, Three Deaths

— 4:48 p.m., Aug. 26, 2020

As San Diego County inches closer toward allowing schools to reopen, county officials announced Wednesday that they would expand free testing for school staff throughout the region.

Even as the county reported 228 new COVID-19 cases and three additional deaths Wednesday, a case rate continuing to remain under the state's 100 cases per 100,000 population (it was 80.2 per 100,000 on Wednesday) means that schools will be able to open in the county be as soon as Sept. 1.

According to County Supervisor Nathan Fletcher, testing for school staff — teachers, paraprofessionals and others — will be made available for free at all of the county's 20 testing sites. Additionally, Fletcher said more will open by the end of September to increase testing accessibility.

The county still does not advise that asymptomatic children get tested, but Fletcher said parents can seek guidance through primary care physicians or seek testing through Rady Children's Hospital, Tri-Care or Kaiser Permanente — depending on what health insurance, if any, a family has.

Paul Gothold, the county's office of education superintendent, thanked county officials Wednesday for passing a $6.55 billion budget the previous day that contained many COVID-19 and education-related line items, including $2 million to make sure students from low-income families have access to the internet for distance learning during the school year.

"This has been an incredibly difficult time," he said. "We miss our students, our teachers and our classified staff."

The county's office of education oversees 42 school districts, more than 80,000 staff members and has at least partial oversight of hundreds of private and charter schools.

Some districts, such as San Diego Unified, have stated that they will have much stricter guidelines before in-person learning will begin again.

The new case data increased the total cases in the county to 37,222, and 668 deaths. A total of 8,327 tests were reported Wednesday, with 2.7% returning positive — lowing the 14-day rolling average to 3.6%, well below the state's 8% guideline. The seven-day average number of tests performed in the county is 7,607.

Of the total positive cases in the county, 3,022 — or 8.1% — have required hospitalization since the pandemic began, and 738 — or 2% — were admitted to an intensive care unit. — City News Service

California Signs Deal To More Than Double Testing Capacity

– 2:28 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2020

California has signed a contract worth up to $1.4 billion with a company to provide a significantly cheaper coronavirus test that will allow the state to eventually more than double the number of people tested to 250,000 per day, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Wednesday.

Gov. Newsom Provide Update On State's Response To Wildfires And COVID-19

California now averages about 100,000 tests per day, with the state paying $100 per test and results taking between five and seven business days. Newsom said the state's contract with Massachusetts-based PerkinElmer will increase the state's testing capacity to a quarter-million per day with each test costing about $31. Results would come within two days.

The contract will initially cost the state $100 million, with a maximum amount of $1.4 billion, according to the Newsom administration. The goal is to begin processing tens of thousands of new tests by November and reach at full capacity by March. – Associated Press

San Diego County Reports 267 New COVID-19 Cases, Five More Deaths

– 4:11 p.m., Tuesday, August 25, 2020

San Diego County public health officials reported 267 new COVID-19 infections and five additional deaths Tuesday, increasing the regional totals to 36,994 cases and 665 deaths — but were still awaiting guidance from the state toward a reopening framework for businesses.

Tuesday's data revealed that three women and two men died, ranging in age from mid-60s to early 90s.

Of the 5,534 tests reported Tuesday, 5% returned positive, raising the 14-day rolling average of positive tests to 3.6%, well below the state's 8% guideline. The seven-day average number of tests performed in the county is 7,386.

Of the total positive cases in the county, 3,006 — or 8.1% — have required hospitalization since the pandemic began, and 736 — or 2% — were admitted to an intensive care unit.

County health officials reported one new community outbreak on Tuesday, bringing the number of outbreaks in the past week to 21. The outbreak was reported in a health care setting.

– City News Service

With School Online, Blood Bank Asks For Donations To Make Up Lost Blood Drives

– 1:50 p.m., Tuesday, August 25, 2020

With schools and colleges moving online due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the San Diego Blood Bank put out a call to the public Tuesday asking for more blood donations as campus blood drives are canceled or put on hiatus.

According to the blood bank, it is working with schools on creative avenues to support blood donation, such as community drives. However, high school and college blood drives would normally start this week — meaning the loss of hundreds of pints of blood. – City News Service

San Diego County Reports 187 New COVID-19 Cases. No New Deaths

– 3:56 p.m., Monday, August 24, 2020

Even as the COVID-19 numbers continue to improve in San Diego County, with 187 new infections and no deaths reported Monday, local officials said there remains no guidance from the state as far as a framework toward reopening the county — leaving many people in limbo.

"We still have not yet received clarity," said County Supervisor Greg Cox. "We do not yet know when we will get these guidelines."

Supervisor Nathan Fletcher said the county was hoping to hear from the state this week.

The cases reported Monday raised the region's cumulative total caseload to 36,727. The number of deaths remains unchanged at 660. The 187 positive cases is the fewest reported in the county since Aug. 10, and the second-fewest in the past month.

Of the 7,351 tests reported Monday, 3% returned positive, lowering the 14-day rolling average of positive tests to 3.5%, well below the state's 8% guideline. The seven-day average number of tests performed in the county is 7,394.

Of the total positive cases in the county, 2,989 — or 8.1% — have required hospitalization since the pandemic began, and 733 — or 2% — were admitted to an intensive care unit. Currently, 275 people are in regional hospitals with COVID-19, 103 of whom are in intensive care – City News Service

SeaWorld San Diego to Reopen With Limited Capacity ‘Zoo Days’ Event

— 1:00 p.m., Monday, Aug. 24, 2020

SeaWorld San Diego, which has been closed to the public for months due to the coronavirus pandemic, will reopen on a limited- capacity basis for a several-weekend program called "Zoo Days Bayside BBQ & Brews," it was announced Monday.

SeaWorld described the program — which will run Fridays through Sundays from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. from Aug. 28 through Sept. 27, plus Labor Day — as an opportunity to explore 40 acres of the park while enjoying barbecue foods, craft beer and wine.

Reservations are required, and guests must adhere to public health protocols such as face coverings, physical distancing and temperature screenings.

– City News Service

Governor Newsom gives update on state's response to wildfires, COVID-19

— 12:00 p.m., Monday, Aug. 24, 2020

Even as hundreds of wildfires continue to rage across California, Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday reported a modest downward trend in confirmed statewide COVID-19 cases.

As of Aug. 24, California's seven-day average for coronavirus cases was just under 6,000, with a 6.5% positivity rate.

The governor did note that the testing numbers were slightly down, but said 11 state coronavirus testing sites have been impacted by the wildfires, which is likely affecting those numbers.

Newsom said officials are trying to curb any further evacuation-related outbreaks of the virus by conducting health screenings in shelters, installing air purifiers and requiring shelter occupants to wear masks and practice social distancing.

But, he added, most people won't be staying in those shelters for long.

"The majority of people that have been evacuated are no longer being evacuated into those congregate shelters, they're being evacuated to hotels," Newsom said, noting that nearly 1,500 evacuees have been placed into 31 hotels.

Addressing the kind of masks people should wear to fight both COVID-19 and wildfire smoke, California Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly said the state has sent surgical masks to evacuation centers and is also working on acquiring and sending out N95s.

Newsom added that people should consult their doctors about the best type of masks for their specific medical needs.

— Michelle Wiley/KQED

Governor Newsom Gives Update On State's Response To Wildfires, COVID-19

San Diego City Parks Open To Fitness Businesses, Places Of Worship

— 11:00 a.m., Monday, Aug. 24, 2020

Starting Monday gyms, fitness businesses and places of worship will be allowed to operate in San Diego city parks.

San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer announced the executive order Tuesday. City Councilman Chris Cate proposed the idea in mid-July, and the San Diego County Board of Supervisors approved a similar ordinance for county parks on Aug. 5.

The directive defers park permit fees for 60 days. Faulconer will bring an ordinance to the council once it is back in session in September that would make the waiving of fees permanent.

San Diego County public health officials reported 337 new COVID-19 cases on Sunday, but no new deaths. The region's totals are now 36,540 cases and 660 deaths.

The county was officially removed from the state's monitoring list Tuesday, setting in motion a 14-day countdown that could see K-12 students back in the classroom as soon as Sept. 1, depending on the decisions of individual school districts.

Currently, 27 schools — mostly private religious schools — have been approved for in-person learning by the county.

San Diego County Reports 291 COVID-19 Cases And Eight Deaths

— 3:21 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 22, 2020

As San Diego County awaits guidance on the effects of its removal from the state's coronavirus watchlist, public health officials reported 291 new COVID-19 cases and eight additional deaths Saturday, raising the region's totals to 36,203 cases and 660 deaths.

Four women and four men died, officials said Saturday. Their ages ranged from mid-40s to mid-90s. All had underlying medical conditions.

The county was officially removed from the state's monitoring list Tuesday, setting in motion a 14-day countdown that could see K-12 students back in the classroom as soon as Sept. 1, depending on the decisions of individual school districts.

However, 27 schools — mostly private, religious schools — have been approved for in-person learning by the county.

The schools include Calvary Christian Academy, Francis Parker School, Chabad Hebrew Academy, San Diego French American School, La Jolla Country Day School and others. They were among nearly 50 schools that applied for a waiver to the county's public health guideline regarding in-person teaching.

Of the 8,824 tests reported Friday, 3% returned positive, bringing the 14-day rolling average to 3.6%, well below the state's 8% guideline. The 7- day rolling average of tests is 7,292 daily.

Of the total positive cases in the county, 2,961 — or 8.2% — have required hospitalization since the pandemic began, and 728 — or 2% — were admitted to an intensive care unit.

County health officials reported no new community outbreaks as of Friday, bringing the number of outbreaks in the past week to 17. — City News Service

S.D. County Reports 304 COVID-19 Cases and Eight Deaths

5 p.m., Friday, Aug.t 21, 2020

As San Diego County awaits guidance on the effects of its removal from the state's coronavirus watchlist, public health officials reported 304 new COVID-19 cases and eight additional deaths Friday, raising the region's totals to 35,912 cases and 652 deaths.

Two women and six men died. Their ages ranged from early 50s to late 80s. At least seven had underlying medical conditions while it is unknown if the eighth did as well.

The county was officially removed from the state's monitoring list Tuesday, setting in motion a 14-day countdown that could see K-12 students back in the classroom as soon as Sept. 1, depending on the decisions of individual school districts.

However, 27 schools — mostly private, religious schools — have been approved in the last three days for in-person learning by the county.

The schools include Calvary Christian Academy, Francis Parker School, Chabad Hebrew Academy, San Diego French American School, La Jolla Country Day School and others. They were among nearly 50 schools that had applied for a waiver to the county's public health guidelines regarding in-person teaching.

Of the 6,567 tests reported Friday, 5% returned positive, bringing the 14-day rolling average to 3.9%, well below the state's 8% guideline. The seven-day rolling average of tests is 7,641 daily. — City News Service

SD County Reports 232 New COVID-19 Cases; Six Deaths

– 5:30 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 20, 2020

As San Diego County continues to await guidance on the effects of its removal from the state's coronavirus watchlist, public health officials reported 232 new COVID-19 cases and six additional deaths, raising the region's totals to 35,608 cases and 644 deaths.

Of the 9,865 tests reported Wednesday, 2% returned positive, lowering the 14-day rolling average to 4%, well below the state's 8% guideline. The seven-day rolling average of tests is 8,061 daily.

Of the total positive cases in the county, 2,930 — or 8.2% — have required hospitalization since the pandemic began, and 726 — or 2% — were admitted to an intensive care unit. The current number of COVID-19 patients in the hospital dropped to 274 Thursday, with 103 of those in the ICU.

County health officials reported three new community outbreaks Wednesday, bringing the number of outbreaks in the past week to 16.

The county continues to keep confidential the names and locations of businesses with outbreaks. — City News Service

San Diego Off State Watch List, Another Countdown Begins

– 4:30 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2020

As San Diego County continues to await guidance on the effects of its removal from the state's coronavirus watchlist, public health officials reported 212 new COVID-19 cases and five additional deaths Wednesday, raising the region's totals to 35,376 cases and 638 deaths.

The county was officially removed from the state's monitoring list Tuesday, setting in motion a 14-day countdown that could see K-12 students back in the classroom as soon as Sept. 1, depending on the decisions of individual school districts. However, any guidance on what that means for businesses was still unclear.

County Supervisor Nathan Fletcher said he and other county officials were expecting to hear about the framework for reopening indoor businesses from the state by Monday.

"That doesn't mean we'll be able to open everything all at once," he said. "We must be mindful. We don't want to undo the progress we've made so far."

The county continues to make progress, with a case rate of 84.4 positive COVID-19 tests per 100,000 people on Wednesday, below the state's 100 per 100,000 guideline. — City News Service

San Diego County Removed From State COVID-19 Monitoring List

– 12:15 p.m., Tuesday, Aug.t 18, 2020

San Diego County was removed from the state's COVID-19 County Monitoring List on Tuesday, according to the state's website.

Santa Cruz was the first county removed from the state’s watchlist but five more counties were added to the list, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Monday. Even though local officials said San Diego met the criteria last week, the county wasn’t removed from the list.

The governor, however, said San Diego wasn’t far behind.

"San Diego we anticipate to come off tomorrow based upon our analysis of the numbers and we look forward to making that announcement,” Newsom said in a live streamed update.

At Monday’s briefing, San Diego County public health officer Dr. Wilma Wooten said the state confirmed the first day the county was below the state’s case rate threshold to be off the list was Saturday. Meaning the county would be off the state’s list by Tuesday.

Local officials initially reported the state-calculated rate of new coronavirus cases remained below the threshold for the required three days as of Friday. A review by California officials found more backlogged cases from an earlier statewide reporting error that altered the rate and delayed San Diego’s removal.

– KPBS Staff

San Diego Mayor Signs Executive Order Allowing Worship, Workouts In City Parks

San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer announced Tuesday that gyms and places of worship would be able to use San Diego's parks to conduct operations outside beginning Monday morning.

City Councilman Chris Cate proposed the idea in mid-July, and the San Diego County Board of Supervisors approved a similar ordinance for county parks on Aug. 5.

Watch:

San Diego Mayor To Sign Executive Order Allowing Worship, Workouts In Parks

Faulconer said a lack of guidance from the state prompted the action.

"There is no direction currently from the state of California about what a county can and cannot do once it sheds the watchlist designation," he said. On Friday, myself and Supervisor [Greg] Cox sent a letter to the governor asking for direction.

San Diego County was placed on that state watchlist by Gov. Gavin Newsom's office for testing higher than 100 positive COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people in the county. The county has been below that number for six days now and was removed from the watch list Tuesday. What that means is unclear.

Per Faulconer's executive order, San Diego's more than 300 parks, 26 miles of shoreline and 57 recreation centers could be used for gyms, fitness classes and worship services starting Monday. Social distancing and face coverings are still encouraged, but Cate said this could help struggling businesses. — City News Service

County Reports 282 New Coronavirus Cases

– 3 p.m., Monday, Aug. 17, 2020

San Diego County on Monday reported 282 newly confirmed COVID-19 cases, raising the region's total to 34,960 cases.

A state official confirmed the first day the county was below the state's case rate threshold was Saturday, county public health officer Dr. Wilma Wooten said. The county had reported an earlier date.

If that holds, the county should be off the state's monitoring list Tuesday and K-12 schools could potentially open after Aug. 31. — Tarryn Mento, KPBS health reporter

Governor Says San Diego County Could Exit State Monitoring List By Tomorrow

— 1:01 p.m., Aug. 17, 2020

After five straight days of San Diego County public health officials reporting a case rate of fewer than 100 positive COVID-19 tests per 100,000 people, Gov. Gavin Newsom Monday said it was "very likely" the county would come off the state's monitoring list tomorrow.

Of the state's 58 counties, 42 remain on that list, with Santa Cruz County falling off Friday.

"This is a dynamic list. People come on, people come off, the numbers shift every single week," Newsom said Monday. "I anticipate this week the numbers to shift again and it looks like, all things being equal and the latest reporting period — 24-hour reporting period, which we will have later this evening — it's very likely San Diego will join the list of those counties removed. So, likely tomorrow."

Previously, county and state officials had said if the rate stays below 100 per 100,000 people (it was 91.9 Sunday) for three consecutive days, the county would officially be removed from that list. After an additional 14 consecutive days below that number, K-12 schools could potentially reopen for in-person teaching, depending on individual school district metrics. — City News Service

SD County Continues To Report Positive COVID-19 Trends

— 4:16 p.m., Aug. 16, 2020

For the fifth day in a row, San Diego County public health officials reported a case rate of fewer than 100 positive COVID-19 tests per 100,000 people — however, the state said it will have to review the data before removing the county from its monitoring list.

Previously, county and state officials had said if the rate stays below 100 per 100,000 people (it was 91.9 Sunday) for three consecutive days, the county would officially be removed from that list. After an additional 14 consecutive days below that number, K-12 schools could potentially reopen for in-person teaching, depending on individual school district metrics.

Some 48 elementary schools have filed waivers with the county to return to school early.

That timeline is now uncertain, as are the specifics of reopening certain businesses for indoor operations.

As the county awaits further guidance from Gov. Gavin Newsom, public health officials on Sunday reported 334 new COVID-19 cases and no new deaths as of Saturday, raising the county's totals to 34,678 cases, with the death toll remaining at 626.

Of the 7,047 tests reported, 5% returned positive, maintaining the 14- day positive testing rate at 4.3%, well below the state's target of 8% or fewer. The 7-day rolling average of tests is 7,944 daily.

Of the total positive cases in the county, 2,856 — or 8.2% — have required hospitalization since the pandemic began, and 715 — or 2.1% — were admitted to an intensive care unit.

County health officials also reported three new community outbreaks, bringing the number of outbreaks in the past week to 24. The latest outbreaks were reported in a business, a restaurant and a restaurant-bar, according to the county Health and Human Services Agency. — City News Service

Fourth Consecutive Day Of Sub-100 Per 100,000 Case Rate In S.D. County

— 4:42 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 15, 2020

For the fourth day in a row, San Diego County public health officials Saturday reported a case rate of fewer than 100 positive COVID-19 tests per 100,000 people, however, the state said it will have to review data before removing the county from its monitoring list.

Previously, county and state officials had said if the rate stays below 100 per 100,000 people — it was 94.7 Saturday — for three consecutive days, the county would officially be removed from that list. After an additional 14 consecutive days below that number, K-12 schools could potentially reopen for in-person teaching, depending on individual school district metrics.

Additionally, 48 elementary schools have filed waivers with the county to return to school early.

That timeline is now uncertain, as is the timeline of reopening certain businesses for indoor operations.

As the county awaits further guidance from Gov. Gavin Newsom, public health officials reported 279 new COVID-19 cases and four new deaths Friday, raising the county's totals to 34,344 cases and 626 deaths.

One woman and three men died between July 5 and Aug, 13, and their ages ranged from the late 50s to late 80s. All had underlying medical conditions. — City News Service

San Diego Meets Criteria To Come Off Watch List But State Delaying Confirmation

— 5:30 p.m., Friday, Aug. 14, 2020

San Diego County marked its third day meeting a key metric that could remove the region from the state’s monitoring list. Local officials reported Friday afternoon the region’s rate of new coronavirus cases was below 100 per 100,000 residents but said the state must first review its own data before confirming.

The county’s rate of new coronavirus cases first surpassed the state’s threshold July 3, prompting governor-ordered restrictions on businesses designed to curb the spread of coronavirus.

California has not yet provided guidelines for reopening businesses once a county comes off the monitoring list, but Gov. Gavin Newsom said earlier Friday that he planned to release more details next week.

An emailed update from the county said the state-calculated case rate was 96.3 per 100,000.

The county reported an additional 406 people tested positive for the virus, a larger daily total than other days this week, raising the county’s total cases to 34,065. Officials also said another seven people died, increasing that tally to 622. — Tarryn Mento, KPBS health reporter

7 New Deaths, 266 New COVID-19 Cases In San Diego

— 3:50 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020

For the second day in a row, San Diego County public health officials reported a case rate of fewer than 100 positive COVID-19 tests per 100,000 people, indicating things may be improving locally with regard to the pandemic.

If the case rate — which was 96.5 per 100,000 people on Thursday — stays below 100 on Friday, the county will officially be off the state's monitoring list. After an additional 14 consecutive days below that number, some schools with students in grades 7-12 could potentially reopen for in-person teaching, depending on individual school district metrics. Theoretically, if current trends continue, students could be in school by Aug. 28.

Additionally, 48 elementary schools have filed waivers with the county to return to school early.

While signs look positive for the region, County Supervisor Nathan Fletcher warned county residents against getting complacent.

"We are seeing progress, but we are in the middle of a marathon, not a sprint to the finish line right in front of us," he said Thursday. "Our goal is not just to have the rate of cases fall below 100 per 100,000, but to keep it there."

State mandates on which businesses are allowed to have indoor operations would not change, Fletcher said, until the county gets more information from Gov. Gavin Newsom's office. No other businesses can reopen after the 17 days unless the state provides further guidance.

San Diego County public health officials reported 266 new COVID-19 cases and seven deaths Thursday, raising the county's totals to 33,659 cases and 615 deaths. — City News Service

SD County Reports 236 COVID-19 Cases, Six Deaths

– 4:35 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2020

San Diego County public health officials reported 236 new COVID-19 cases and six deaths Wednesday, raising the county's totals to 33,393 cases and 608 deaths.

Five women and one man died between July 28 and Aug. 11. Their ages ranged from 66 to 96 and all had underlying medical conditions. Of the deaths reported thus far during the pandemic, 96% had some underlying medical condition.

Of the 7,339 tests reported Wednesday, 3% returned positive, lowering the 14-day positive testing rate to 4.7%, well below the state's target of 8% or fewer. The 7-day rolling average of tests is 8,413 daily.

Of the total positive cases in the county, 2,792 — or 8.4% — have required hospitalization since the pandemic began, and 696 — or 2.1% — were admitted to an intensive care unit.

The county's case rate per 100,000 residents as of Wednesday is 94.2. This is below the metric of 100 cases per 100,000 people set by the state. This is the first time the case rate has been below 100 since the county was placed on the state's County Monitoring List on July 3.

San Diego County would need to report a case rate of 100 or below for three days to get off the state's county monitoring list and a case rate of 100 or below for an additional 14 days before schools grades 7-12 can reopen. No other businesses can reopen after the 17 days unless the state provides further guidance.

County health officials also reported two community outbreaks Wednesday, bringing the number of outbreaks in the past week to 26.

The latest outbreaks were reported in a grocery store and a manufacturing setting, according to the county Health and Human Services Agency.

The number of community outbreaks remains well above the county's goal of fewer than seven in a seven-day span. An outbreak is defined as three or more COVID-19 cases in a setting and in people of different households in the past 14 days. — City News Service

Newsom Says California Turning Corner In Virus Fight

– 1:15 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2020

Gov. Newsom Gives Update On COVID-19 Response

California is showing improvement in its fight against the coronavirus pandemic, Gov. Gavin Newsom said Wednesday, citing a significantly lower number of confirmed new cases as the state begins to clear backlogged cases from a data failure.

The Democratic governor said he also was encouraged by a downward trend in the state’s hospitalization rates which he noted are down 21%, and ICU admissions, down 15% over the past 14 days. The number of newly confirmed cases Wednesday, 5,433, was “another indication that we’re turning the corner on this pandemic," he said.

The latest figures represent a significant drop from the record 12,807 new daily cases reported statewide during the spike in infections last month.

More than 10,600 people statewide have died, including 180 reported Wednesday, with the great majority in Los Angeles County. — Associated Press

— KPBS Staff

The Nat To Stay Closed Until 2021 But Science Never Sleeps

– 3: 30 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020

The San Diego Natural History Museum announced Friday that they will remain closed through at least the end of the year. Recognizing the volatile nature of the pandemic, the museum cited the need to have a fixed goal, protect the community and make better use of resources.

After a very brief reopening in early July, the museum shut its doors again after San Diego's coronavirus numbers put the county onto Governor Newsom's watch list.

Maintaining 100 current employees, the museum is shifting its staffing focus towards supporting the distance learning models for local schools and students, and connecting them to the natural environment in the region. Lesson plans, video series and interactive resources are ways that the Nat is looking to bring a traditional field trip experience into the current reality. The Nat is currently working with educators and in partnerships with nonprofits to plan and devise this work.

The museum is also working on new programs to connect all residents to nature. – Julia Dixon Evans, KPBS Arts Calendar Editor and Producer

County Reports Fewer Than 200 COVID-19 Cases For First Time Since June

– 3:00 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020

San Diego County health officials reported 182 new COVID-19 infections Tuesday, the first time that fewer than 200 new cases have been reported since June 22.

However, eight coronavirus fatalities were reported Tuesday, raising the death toll to 602. Of the deaths, 96% had some underlying medical condition. The total case count for COVID-19 climbed to 33,157 Tuesday.

Meanwhile, Supervisor Nathan Fletcher said the county's partnerships with its 18 incorporated communities were allowing law enforcement to step up efforts to punish egregious violators of public health orders.

A visit from county staff is the first action used, followed by a cease and desist order and then an order to close. If an entity refuses to close after that order it will be cited and fined $1,000 — as University Heights gym Boulevard Fitness was Tuesday, Fletcher said.

"The selfish defiance of the public health orders only hurts those acting in good faith," he said. "This is not out of a desire to be punitive."

County health officials also reported six community outbreaks, bringing the number of outbreaks in the past week to 29.

The latest outbreaks were reported in a restaurant/bar setting, a gym, two in government offices and two in businesses, according to the county Health and Human Services Agency. — City News Service

San Diego County Gives COVID-19 Update

San Diego County Reports 228 New COVID-19 Cases, Five Community Outbreaks

—4:20 p.m., Monday, Aug. 10, 2020

San Diego County health officials Monday reported 228 new COVID-19 infections and five community outbreaks, raising the county's cumulative caseload to 32,975 and bringing to two dozen the number of outbreaks in the past week.

No new coronavirus fatalities were reported Monday. The total death toll remains at 594.

The new outbreaks were reported in a restaurant, a restaurant/bar setting, a government office, a business and a grocery store, according to the county Health and Human Services Agency.

The number of community outbreaks remains well above the county's goal of fewer than seven in a seven-day span.

A community setting outbreak is defined as three or more COVID-19 cases in a setting and in people of different households in the past 14 days.

Of the total positive cases in the county, 2,752 — or 8.3% — required hospitalization since the pandemic began, and 689 — or 2.1% — were admitted to an intensive care unit.

The county reported 7,570 tests Saturday, 3% of which returned positive. The 14-day rolling average percentage of positive cases is 5%. The state's target is fewer than 8.0% testing positive. The seven -day daily average of tests is 8,148.

— City News Service

'Months, Not Weeks,'' Until Students Can Return To San Diego Unified Schools

San Diego Unified School District officials announced Monday they were making preparations to get children back in schools, but were looking at a timeline of "months, not weeks," before that could become a reality.

The district will adopt strict new standards to protect students, staff and the community from the spread of COVID-19 when schools convene in person again, District Superintendent Cindy Marten said during a news conference Monday. The measures are being adopted and developed in consultation with experts from UCSD.

In the meantime, the district will begin classes remotely this month.

Conditions for reopening local schools will be stricter than state standards, will proceed in phases and will require critical protective measures including mandatory masks, proper ventilation and strict social distancing, according to district leaders.

State standards for reopening schools already require a seven-day testing positivity rate of less than 8% and other factors, but the panel convened by San Diego Unified called for adding contact tracing metrics and other factors included in the County of San Diego's designated health triggers.

"We consulted with the world's leading experts on all aspects of this pandemic because we wanted a comprehensive set of standards to create the safest possible environment for our students and staff," said Dr. Howard Taras, UCSD professor and consulting pediatrician for San Diego Unified. "The strength in these new standards comes precisely from this combination of factors. Taken together, they represent the strictest reasonable conditions for safety when operations eventually resume."

Governor Gives Few Details On Top California Official's Exit

—4:00 p.m., Monday, Aug. 10, 2020

A day after announcing that California's public health director suddenly resigned, Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday dodged questions about her departure even as he stressed the importance of transparency and accountability.

“Decisions were made, and we're moving forward," he said of the Sunday night resignation by Dr. Sonia Angell. “No one's trying to hide that, no one's trying to mask that. We're owning that."

The remarks came during Newsom's first news conference since county and state health officials revealed the data error, which led to a lag in the reporting of nearly 300,000 coronavirus test results. He last spoke to the public one week earlier. — City News Service

Gov. Newsom Gives Update On COVID-19 Response

Angell said in a resignation letter made public that she's departing from her role as director and state public health officer at the California Department of Public Health.

Her letter to staff, released by the California Health and Human Services Agency, did not give a specific reason for her departure. Pressed repeatedly by reporters, Newsom would not answer whether he asked her to resign. But he said that he and Dr. Mark Ghaly, secretary of the California Health and Human Services Agency, made “changes" and “adjustments" to the state's leadership team.

“She wrote a resignation letter, and I accepted her resignation. We’re all accountable in our respective roles to what happens underneath us," he said. “If it’s not obvious, then I encourage you to consider the fact that we accepted her resignation."

— Associated Press

SeaWorld Entertainment Announces Revenue, Attendance Losses Amid Pandemic

—3:23 p.m., Monday, Aug. 10, 2020

SeaWorld Entertainment Monday announced major revenue and attendance declines in the second quarter stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic.

SeaWorld parks drew 300,000 guests during the quarter, down from 6.5 million guests from the year-ago second quarter. The company reported $18 million in revenue in the second quarter, down from $406 million during the same time last year. The company reported a net loss of $131 million during the second quarter.

The global public health crisis was cited as the major contributing factor, as all SeaWorld parks were closed for nearly three months due to pandemic restrictions.

A phased reopening of some parks began in early June, and overall, a total of seven parks were open for 98 operating days compared with all 12 parks open for 861 days during the second quarter of 2019. The reopened parks operated at limited capacity, limited hours and/or limited days.

— City News Service

San Diego County Reports 417 New COVID-19 Cases, One Death

—4:23 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 9, 2020

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