PS2 Controller For PC Archives

PS2 Controller For PC Archives

PS2 Controller For PC Archives

PS2 Controller For PC Archives

PlayStation 2

Sixth-generation and second home video game console developed by Sony Interactive Entertainment
Left: Original PlayStation 2 with vertical stand
Right: Slimline PlayStation 2 with vertical stand, 8 MB memory card and DualShock 2 controller
Also known asPS2
DeveloperSony Computer Entertainment
ManufacturerSony Corporation
Product familyPlayStation
TypeHome video game console
GenerationSixth generation
Release datePlayStation 2
  • JP: March 4, 2000
  • NA: October 26, 2000
  • EU: November 24, 2000
  • AU: November 30, 2000
PlayStation 2 Slimline
  • EU: October 29, 2004
  • JP: November 3, 2004
  • NA: November 25, 2004
  • AU: December 2, 2004
Lifespan2000–2013
Introductory price¥39,800, US$299, £299, F2,990, DM869[1][2][3][4]
Discontinued
Units shipped155.0 million (as of March 31, 2012)
MediaDVD, CD
System-on-chip usedIntegrated Emotion Engine, Graphics Synthesizer, 32 MB of RDRAM, and 4 MB of eDRAM(PlayStation 2 Slimline models only)
CPUMIPS R5900 Emotion Engine[7][8] @
Memory32 MB of RDRAM (system RAM)[10]
4 MB of eDRAM (video RAM)[11][12]
Removable storage
Display
Graphics150 MHz Graphics Synthesizer[7]
SoundPCM 2ch 48KHz, Dolby Digital 5.1 and DTS 5.1
Controller inputDualShock 2, DualShock, PlayStation Controller, EyeToy, PlayStation 2 DVD Remote Control, PlayStation Portable
Connectivity100 Mbit Ethernet/modem(requires adapter on SCPH-10000-500xx models), 2 × USB 1.1, 1 × IEEE 1394 interface
Online services
DimensionsOriginal PS2: 3.1" (78.7 mm) × 11.9" (302.3 mm) × 7.2" (182.9 mm)
MassOriginal PS2: 4.85 lb (2.2 kg)
Best-selling gameGrand Theft Auto: San Andreas: 17.33 million sold (as of February 2009)[13]
Backward
compatibility
PlayStation
PredecessorPlayStation
SuccessorPlayStation 3

The PlayStation 2 (officially abbreviated and branded as PS2) is a home video game console developed and marketed by Sony Computer Entertainment. It was first released in Japan on March 4, 2000, in North America on October 26, 2000, in Europe on November 24, 2000, and Australia on November 24, 2000. It is the successor to the original PlayStation, as well as the second instalment in the PlayStation console line-up. A sixth-generation console, it competed with Sega's Dreamcast, Nintendo's GameCube, and Microsoft's original Xbox.

Announced in 1999, the PS2 offered backward-compatibility for its predecessor's DualShock controller, as well as its games. The PS2 is the best-selling video game console of all time, having sold over 155 million units worldwide.[14] Over 3,800 game titles have been released for the PS2, with over 1.5 billion copies sold.[15] Sony later manufactured several smaller, lighter revisions of the console known as Slimline models in 2004.

Even with the release of its successor, the PlayStation 3, the PS2 remained popular well into the seventh generation, and continued to be produced until 2013, when Sony finally announced it had been discontinued after over twelve years of production—one of the longest lifespans of a video game console. Despite the announcement, new games for the console continued to be produced until the end of 2013, including Final Fantasy XI: Seekers of Adoulin for Japan, FIFA 13 for North America, and Pro Evolution Soccer 2014 for Europe. Repair services for the system in Japan ended on September 7, 2018.

History

Though Sony has kept details of the PlayStation 2's development secret, work on the console began around the time that the original PlayStation was released (in late 1994).[16] Insiders stated that it was developed in the U.S. West Coast by former members of Argonaut Software.[17] By 1997 word had leaked to the press that the console would have backward-compatibility with the original PlayStation, a built-in DVD player, and Internet connectivity.[17][18] Sony announced the PlayStation 2 (PS2) on March 1, 1999. The video game console was positioned as a competitor to Sega's Dreamcast, the first sixth-generation console to be released, although ultimately the main rivals of the PS2 were Nintendo's GameCube and Microsoft's Xbox.[19][20] The Dreamcast itself launched very successfully in North America later that year, selling over 500,000 units within two weeks.[21]

Soon after the Dreamcast's North American launch, Sony unveiled the PlayStation 2 at the Tokyo Game Show on September 20, 1999.[22] Sony showed fully playable demos of upcoming PlayStation 2 games including Gran Turismo 2000 (later released as Gran Turismo 3: A-Spec) and Tekken Tag Tournament—which showed the console's graphic abilities and power.[23]

The PS2 was launched in March 2000 in Japan, October in North America, and November in Europe. Sales of the console, games and accessories pulled in $250 million on the first day, beating the $97 million made on the first day of the Dreamcast.[24] Directly after its release, it was difficult to find PS2 units on retailer shelves[25] due to manufacturing delays.[26] Another option was purchasing the console online through auction websites such as eBay, where people paid over a thousand dollars for the console.[27] The PS2 initially sold well partly on the basis of the strength of the PlayStation brand and the console's backward-compatibility, selling over 980,000 units in Japan by March 5, 2000, one day after launch.[28] This allowed the PS2 to tap the large install base established by the PlayStation—another major selling point over the competition. Later, Sony added new development kits for game developers and more PS2 units for consumers. The PS2's built-in functionality also expanded its audience beyond the gamer,[6] as its debut pricing was the same or less than a standalone DVD player. This made the console a low-cost entry into the home theater market.[29]

The success of the PS2 at the end of 2000 caused Sega problems both financially and competitively, and Sega announced the discontinuation of the Dreamcast in March 2001, just 18 months after its successful Western launch. Despite the Dreamcast still receiving support through 2001, the PS2 remained the only sixth-generation console for over 6 months before it faced competition from new rivals: Nintendo's GameCube and Microsoft's Xbox. Many analysts predicted a close three-way matchup among the three consoles. The Xbox had the most powerful hardware, while the GameCube was the least expensive console, and Nintendo changed its policy to encourage third-party developers. While the PlayStation 2 theoretically had the weakest specification of the three, it had a head start due to its installed base plus strong developer commitment, as well as a built-in DVD player (the Xbox required an adapter, while the GameCube lacked support entirely).[30] While the PlayStation 2's initial games lineup was considered mediocre, this changed during the 2001 holiday season with the release of several blockbuster games that maintained the PS2's sales momentum and held off its newer rivals. Sony also countered the Xbox by temporarily securing PlayStation 2 exclusives for highly anticipated games such as the Grand Theft Auto series and Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty.[31]

Sony cut the price of the console in May 2002 from US$299 to $199 in North America,[32] making it the same price as the GameCube and $100 less than the Xbox. It also planned to cut the price in Japan around that time.[33] It cut the price twice in Japan in 2003.[34] In 2006, Sony cut the cost of the console in anticipation of the release of the PlayStation 3.[34]

Sony, unlike Sega with its Dreamcast, originally placed little emphasis on online gaming during its first few years, although that changed upon the launch of the online-capable Xbox. Coinciding with the release of Xbox Live, Sony released the PlayStation Network Adapter in late 2002, with several online first-party titles released alongside it, such as SOCOM U.S. Navy SEALs to demonstrate its active support for Internet play.[35] Sony also advertised heavily, and its online model had the support of Electronic Arts (EA); EA did not offer online Xbox titles until 2004. Although Sony and Nintendo both started out late, and although both followed a decentralized model of online gaming where the responsibility is up to the developer to provide the servers, Sony's moves made online gaming a major selling point of the PS2.

In September 2004, in time for the launch of Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, Sony revealed a newer, slimmer PS2. In preparation for the launch of the new models (SCPH-700xx-9000x), Sony stopped making the older models (SCPH-3000x-500xx) to let the distribution channel empty its stock of the units.[citation needed] After an apparent manufacturing issue—Sony reportedly underestimated demand—caused some initial slowdown in producing the new unit caused in part by shortages between the time the old units were cleared out and the new units were ready. The issue was compounded in Britain when a Russian oil tanker became stuck in the Suez Canal, blocking a ship from China carrying PS2s bound for the UK. During one week in November, British sales totalled 6,000 units—compared to 70,000 units a few weeks prior.[36] There were shortages in more than 1,700 stores in North America on the day before Christmas.[37]

In 2010, Sony introduced a TV with a built-in Playstation 2.[38][39]

Hardware

Software for the PlayStation 2 was distributed primarily on DVD-ROM, with some titles being published on CD-ROM. In addition, the console can play audio CDs and DVD movies and is backward-compatible with almost all original PlayStation games. The PlayStation 2 also supports PlayStation memory cards and controllers, although original PlayStation memory cards will only work with original PlayStation games[40] and the controllers may not support all functions (such as analog buttons) for PlayStation 2 games.

The standard PlayStation 2 memory card has an 8 MB capacity.[41] There are a variety of non-Sony manufactured memory cards available for the PlayStation 2, allowing for a memory capacity larger than the standard 8 MB.

The console also features 2 USB ports, and 1 IEEE 1394 (Firewire) port (SCPH-10000 to 3900x only). A hard disk drive can be installed in an expansion bay on the back of the console, and is required to play certain games, notably the popular Final Fantasy XI.[42] This is only available on certain models.

The console uses the Emotion Engine CPU, custom-designed by Sony and Toshiba and based on the MIPS architecture with a floating point performance of 6.2 GFLOPS.[43] The GPU is likewise custom-designed for the console and called the Graphics Synthesizer, with a fillrate of 2.4 gigapixels/second, capable of rendering up to 75 million polygons per second.[44] When accounting for features such as lighting, texture mapping, artificial intelligence, and game physics, it has a real-world performance of 3 million to 16 million polygons per second.[44][45]

Video and audio

The PlayStation 2 may natively output video resolutions on SDTV and HDTV from 480i to 480p while other games, such as Gran Turismo 4 and Tourist Trophy are known to support up-scaled 1080i resolution[46] using any of the following standards: composite video[47] (480i), S-Video[48] (480i), RGB[49] (480i/p), VGA[50] (for progressive scan games and PS2 Linux only), YPBPR component video[51] (which display most original PlayStation games in their native 240p mode which most HDTV sets do not support[52]), and D-Terminal.[53] Cables are available for all of these signal types; these cables also output analog stereo audio. Additionally, an RF modulator is available for the system to connect to older TVs.[54]

Digital (S/PDIF) audio may also be output by the console via its TOSLINK connector[55] which outputs 2.0 PCM, 5.1, and 6.1 channel sound in Dolby Digital, Dolby Digital Surround EX, DTS, And DTS-ES formats.

Online support

PlayStation 2 users had the option to play select games over the Internet, using dial-up or a broadbandInternet connection. The PlayStation 2 Network Adaptor was required for the original models, while the slim models included networking ports on the console. Instead of having a unified, subscription-based online service like Xbox Live as competitor Microsoft later chose for its Xbox console, online multiplayer functionality on the PlayStation 2 was the responsibility of the game publisher and ran on third-party servers. Many games that supported online play exclusively supported broadband Internet access.

Retail configurations

The PS2 has undergone many revisions,[56] some only of internal construction and others involving substantial external changes.

The PS2 is primarily differentiated between models featuring the original "fat" case design and "slimline" models, which were introduced at the end of 2004. In 2010, the Sony Bravia KDL-22PX300 was made available to consumers. It was a 22" HD-Ready television which incorporated a built-in PlayStation 2.[57][58]

The PS2 standard color is matte black. Several variations in color were produced in different quantities and regions, including ceramic white, light yellow, metallic blue (aqua), metallic silver, navy (star blue), opaque blue (astral blue), opaque black (midnight black), pearl white, sakura purple, satin gold, satin silver, snow white, super red, transparent blue (ocean blue), and also Limited Edition color Pink, which was distributed in some regions such as Oceania, and parts of Asia.[59][60][61]

In September 2004, Sony unveiled its third major hardware revision. Available in late October 2004, it was smaller, thinner, and quieter than the original versions and included a built-in Ethernet port (in some markets it also had an integrated modem). Due to its thinner profile, it did not contain the 3.5" expansion bay and therefore did not support the internal hard disk drive. It also lacked an internal power supply until a later revision (excluding the Japan version), similar to the GameCube, and had a modified Multitap expansion. The removal of the expansion bay was criticized as a limitation due to the existence of titles such as Final Fantasy XI, which required the use of the HDD.

Sony also manufactured a consumer device called the PSX that can be used as a digital video recorder and DVD burner in addition to playing PS2 games. The device was released in Japan on December 13, 2003, and was the first Sony product to include the XrossMediaBar interface. It did not sell well in the Japanese market and was not released anywhere else.[62]

Disc-read error lawsuit

A class-action lawsuit was filed against Sony Computer Entertainment America Inc. on July 16, 2002, in the Superior Court of California, County of San Mateo. The lawsuit addresses consumer reports of inappropriate "no disc" error (disc read error) messages and other problems associated with playing DVDs and CDs on the PlayStation 2.

Sony settled its "disc read error" lawsuit by compensating the affected customers with US$25, a free game from a specified list, and the reduced cost repair or replacement (at SCEA's discretion) of the damaged system. This settlement was subject to the courts' approval, and hearings began in the US and Canada on April 28, 2006, and May 11, 2006, respectively.[63]

Games

PlayStation 2 software is distributed on CD-ROM and DVD-ROM; the two formats are differentiated by the color of their discs' bottoms, with CD-ROMs being blue and DVD-ROMs being silver. The PlayStation 2 offered some particularly high-profile exclusive games. Most main entries in the Grand Theft Auto, Final Fantasy, and Metal Gear Solid series were released exclusively for the console. Several prolific series got their start on the PlayStation 2, including God of War, Ratchet & Clank, Jak and Daxter, Devil May Cry,Kingdom Hearts, and Sly Cooper. Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas was the best-selling game on the console.

Game releases peaked in 2004, but declined with the release of the PlayStation 3 in 2006. The last new games for the console were Final Fantasy XI: Seekers of Adoulin in Asia, FIFA 13 in North America, and Pro Evolution Soccer 2014 in Europe. As of June 30, 2007, a total of 10,035 software titles had been released worldwide including games released in multiple regions as separate titles.[64]

Reception

Initial reviews in 2000 of the PlayStation 2 acclaimed the console, with reviewers commending its hardware and graphics capabilities, its ability to play DVDs, and the system's backwards compatibility with games and hardware for the original PlayStation. Early points of criticism included the lack of online support at the time, its inclusion of only two controller ports, and the system's price at launch compared to the Dreamcast in 2000.[65][66]PC Magazine in 2001 called the console "outstanding", praising its "noteworthy components" such as the Emotion Engine CPU, 32MB of RAM, support for IEEE 1394 (branded as "i.LINK" by Sony and "FireWire" by Apple), and the console's two USB ports while criticizing its "expensive" games and its support for only two controllers without the multitap accessory.[67]

Later reviews, especially after the launch of the competing GameCube and Xbox systems, continued to praise the PlayStation 2's large game library and DVD playback, while routinely criticizing the PlayStation 2's lesser graphics performance compared to the newer systems and its rudimentary online service compared to Xbox Live. In 2002, CNET rated the console 7.3 out of 10, calling it a "safe bet" despite not being the "newest or most powerful", noting that the console "yields in-game graphics with more jagged edges". CNET also criticized the DVD playback functionality, claiming that the console's video quality was "passable" and that the playback controls were "rudimentary", recommending users to purchase a remote control. The console's two controller ports and expensiveness of its memory cards were also a point of criticism.[68]

Back of the slim model, showing its built in networking

The slim model of the PlayStation 2 received positive reviews, especially for its incredibly small size and built-in networking. The slim console's requirement for a separate power adapter was often criticized while the top-loading disc drive was often noted as being far less likely to break compared to the tray-loading drive of the original model.[69][70]

Sales

Demand for the PlayStation 2 remained strong throughout much of its lifespan, selling over 1.4 million units in Japan by March 31, 2000. Over 10.6 million units were sold worldwide by March 31, 2001.[71] In 2005, the PlayStation 2 became the fastest game console to reach 100 million units shipped, accomplishing the feat within 5 years and 9 months from its launch; this was surpassed 4 years later when the Nintendo DS reached 100 million shipments in 4 years and 5 months from its launch.[72] By July 2009, the system had sold 138.8 million units worldwide, with 51 million of those units sold in PAL regions.[73]

Overall, over 155 million PlayStation 2 units were sold worldwide by March 31, 2012, the year Sony officially stopped supplying updated sales numbers of the system.[74]

Accessories

The EyeToy – a motion-detecting camera

The PlayStation 2's DualShock 2 controller is largely identical to the PlayStation's DualShock, with the same basic functionality. However, it includes analog pressure sensitivity on the face, shoulder and D-pad buttons, replacing the digital buttons of the original.[75] (These buttons later became digital again with the release of the DualShock 4.[76]) Like its predecessor, the DualShock 2 controller has force feedback, or "vibration" functionality. It is lighter and includes two more levels of vibration.

The PlayStation 2 DVD remote control

General

An 8MB memory card for the PlayStation 2

Optional hardware includes additional DualShock or DualShock 2 controllers, a PS2 DVD remote control, an internal or external hard disk drive (HDD), a network adapter, horizontal and vertical stands, PlayStation or PS2 memory cards, the multitap for PlayStation or PS2, a USB motion camera (EyeToy), a USB keyboard and mouse, and a headset.

The original PS2 multitap (SCPH-10090) cannot be plugged into the newer slim models, as the multitap connects to the memory card slot as well as the controller slot and the memory card slot on the slimline is shallower. New slim-design multitaps (SCPH-70120) were manufactured for these models; however, third-party adapters also exist to permit original multitaps to be used.

Early versions of the PS2 could be networked via an i.LINK port, though this had little game support and was dropped. Some third party manufacturers have created devices that allow disabled people to access the PS2 through ordinary switches, etc.

Some third-party companies, such as JoyTech, have produced LCDmonitor and speaker attachments for the PS2, which attach to the back of the console. These allow users to play games without access to a television as long as there is access to mains electricity or a similar power source. These screens can fold down onto the PS2 in a similar fashion to laptop screens.

Music

There are many accessories for musical games, such as dance pads for Dance Dance Revolution, In the Groove, and Pump It Up titles and High School Musical 3: Senior Year Dance. Konami microphones for use with the Karaoke Revolution games, dual microphones (sold with and used exclusively for SingStar games), various "guitar" controllers (for the Guitar Freaks series and Guitar Hero series), the drum set controller (sold in a box set (or by itself) with a "guitar" controller and a USB microphone (for use with Rock Band and Guitar Hero series, World Tour and newer), and a taiko drum controller for Taiko: Drum Master.

Controllers

Specialized controllers include light guns (GunCon), fishing rod and reel controllers, a Dragon Quest VIII "slime" controller, a Final Fantasy X-2 "Tiny Bee" dual pistol controller, an Onimusha 3 katana controller, and a Resident Evil 4 chainsaw controller.

Mouse and keyboard

Unlike the PlayStation, which requires the use of an official Sony PlayStation Mouse to play mouse-compatible games, the few PS2 games with mouse support work with a standard USB mouse as well as a USB trackball.[77] In addition, some of these games also support the usage of a USB keyboard for text input, game control (in lieu of a DualShock or DualShock 2 gamepad, in tandem with a USB mouse), or both.

Homebrew development

Using homebrew programs, it is possible to play various audio and video file formats on a PS2. Homebrew programs can also be used to play patched backups of original PS2 DVD games on unmodified consoles, and to install retail discs to an installed hard drive on older models. Homebrew emulators of older computer and gaming systems have been developed for the PS2.[78]

Sony released a Linux-based operating system, Linux for PlayStation 2, for the PS2 in a package that also includes a keyboard, mouse, Ethernet adapter and HDD. In Europe and Australia, the PS2 comes with a free Yabasic interpreter on the bundled demo disc. This allows users to create simple programs for the PS2. A port of the NetBSD project and BlackRhino GNU/Linux, an alternative Debian-based distribution, are also available for the PS2.

Successor

A successor, the PlayStation 3 was released in Japan and North America in November 2006 and Europe in March 2007.

See also

References

  1. ^"Business Development/Europe". Sony Computer Entertainment. Archived from the original on April 22, 2004. Retrieved December 19, 2007.
  2. ^Perry, Douglas (September 11, 1999). "Call It PlayStation 2". IGN. Archived from the original on October 22, 2019. Retrieved October 22, 2019.
  3. ^"Sony announces PS2 launch date and price". Gamespot. May 13, 2000. Archived from the original on October 22, 2019. Retrieved October 22, 2019.
  4. ^Goodley, Simon (August 5, 2000). "Sony delays UK launch of PlayStation 2". The Telegraph. Archived from the original on October 22, 2019. Retrieved October 22, 2019.
  5. ^. Famitsu (in Japanese). Enterbrain. December 28, 2012. Archived from the original on December 28, 2012. Retrieved December 28, 2012.
  6. ^ ab"PlayStation 2 manufacture ends after 12 years". The Guardian. January 4, 2013. Archived from the original on September 21, 2013. Retrieved January 4, 2013.
  7. ^ abcDiefendorff, Keith (April 19, 1999). "Sony's Emotionally Charged Chip"(PDF). Microprocessor Report. 13 (5). Archived(PDF) from the original on September 11, 2006. Retrieved June 22, 2017.
  8. ^Shiloy, Anton (February 26, 2007). "Sony Removes Emotion Engine, Graphics Synthesizer from PAL PlayStation 3". X-bit labs. Archived from the original on October 26, 2016. Retrieved May 7, 2014.
  9. ^John L. Hennessy and David A. Patterson. "Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach, Third Edition". ISBN 1-55860-724-2
  10. ^Shimpi, Anand. "Rambus DRAM: Uncovering Facts & Burying Rumors". AnandTech. Archived from the original on February 19, 2017. Retrieved February 19, 2017.
  11. ^Perry, Douglass C. "The Untapped Power of PlayStation 2". IGN. Archived from the original on February 18, 2017. Retrieved February 18, 2017.
  12. ^Leadbetter, Richard (July 21, 2012). "Digital Foundry vs. PS2 Classics on PlayStation 3". Archived from the original on August 6, 2012. Retrieved February 19, 2017.
  13. ^Guinness (February 2009). Guinness World Records 2009 Gamer's Edition. pp. 108–109. ISBN .
  14. ^"Cumulative Worldwide Hardware Unit Sales (Sell-In)". Sony Interactive Entertainment Business Development. Archived from the original on April 27, 2019. Retrieved October 30, 2019.
  15. ^Makuch, Eddie (February 15, 2011). "150 million PS2 units shipped worldwide". Asia.gamespot.com. Archived from the original on March 22, 2011.
  16. ^"Letters". Next Generation. No. 22. Imagine Media. October 1996. p. 203.
  17. ^ ab"Saturn/PS-X Sequels". Next Generation. No. 27. Imagine Media. March 1997. p. 24.
  18. ^"Gaming Gossip". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 93. Ziff Davis. April 1997. p. 28.
  19. ^Whitehead, Dan (October 25, 2011). "Dreamcast: A Forensic Retrospective Article". Eurogamer.net. Archived from the original on October 15, 2014.
  20. ^"PlayStation 2 Timeline". GameSpy. p. 3. Archived from the original on June 4, 2004. Retrieved August 19, 2008.
  21. ^"A Look Back at the Sega Dreamcast". Archived from the original on January 18, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2016.
  22. ^Perry, Douglass C. (September 20, 1999). "TGS 1999: Sony's Grand Showing". Archived from the original on July 28, 2017. Retrieved December 30, 2016.
  23. ^"Roosevelt Creative Arts Middle School –". Archived from the original on September 21, 2013. Retrieved December 30, 2016.
  24. ^"Sony Pulls in Over $250 Million at Launch". IGN. June 17, 2012. Archived from the original on September 21, 2013.
  25. ^"PlayStation 2 Timeline". GameSpy. pp. 2–3. Archived from the original on June 4, 2004. Retrieved December 19, 2007.
  26. ^"PS2 history". gamesindustry.biz. November 22, 2006. Archived from the original on October 11, 2007. Retrieved September 25, 2007.
  27. ^"PlayStation 2 Timeline". GameSpy. p. 3. Archived from the original on June 4, 2004. Retrieved December 19, 2007.
  28. ^"PlayStation 2 Timeline". GameSpy. p. 2. Archived from the original on June 4, 2004. Retrieved December 19, 2007.
  29. ^What Ever Happened To The Dreamcast?. TechnoBuffalo. Retrieved on August 23, 2013.
  30. ^"Hardware Behind the Consoles - Part II: Nintendo's GameCube". AnandTech. Archived from the original on May 11, 2013. Retrieved October 21, 2012.
  31. ^Morris, Chris (May 14, 2002). "Sony slashes PlayStation prices: Preemptive move undercuts competition and could spark video game price war". CNN. Archived from the original on November 30, 2005. Retrieved January 4, 2006.
  32. ^
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, PS2 Controller For PC Archives

View Full Version : Best modern PC controller?



Those who play games on PC, what controller do you use (assuming you don't exclusively use keyboard/mouse) ?

I've been using PS2 controllers on PC (via adapter) for nearly 15 years now, but recently my adapter broke, and I replaced it with one of these (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001AATQ0Y/), but unfortunately the new adapter has rather bad input lag with the D-Pad. I figure, instead of spending more money trying other PS2 controller adapters, maybe its time to switch to something else entirely.

Those who play games on PC, what controller do you use (assuming you don't exclusively use keyboard/mouse) ?

I've been using PS2 controllers on PC (via adapter) for nearly 15 years now, but recently my adapter broke, and I replaced it with one of these (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001AATQ0Y/), but unfortunately the new adapter has rather bad input lag with the D-Pad. I figure, instead of spending more money trying other PS2 controller adapters, maybe its time to switch to something else entirely.

XBox 360 or XBone controller for the win. Amazing controllers. PS gamers just need to get their heads out of their butts.

http://support.xbox.com/en-US/xbox-on-windows/accessories/xbox-controller-for-windows-setup

https://support.xbox.com/en-US/xbox-on-windows/accessories/connect-xbox-one-controller-to-pc

Edit: If you love that Playstation controoler, there is always this option:

http://www.techradar.com/how-to/gaming/how-to-use-the-ps4-dualshock-4-controller-on-a-pc-1309014

Or the dual shock USB adapter.

https://www.amazon.com/DualShock-4-USB-Wireless-Adaptor-playstation/dp/B01KWLKKQU

360 is a no-go since I hate its D-Pad (it's great other then that though).

For the other two, a few questions;
How is the XBox One controllers D-Pad?
Do the new generation of PS4 controllers still have the issue with the rubber on the joysticks peeling off?
Can the view/menu or share/options be used to emulate Start/Select?
Does the PS4 touch pad have any issues when used to control a mouse cursor?

I use the Microsoft PC Gamepad (it's basically just a 360 controller with a usb cord). It doesn't work on an actual 360, having tried it, but I don't own one personally anyway so it's fine.

Originally bought it for Dark Souls (bought the horrible PC port and needed a controller) but I use it for everything. It works 100% dandy-fine.

If you want great digital control, buy an arcade stick. I have a Hori XBox 360 USB fighting stick.

If you want a good analog controller, buy an XBox 360 or XBox One controller.

If you want a good solution for both of these, buy an XBox One or PS4 controller. Honestly, if Microsoft got anything right, the XBox One controller is exceptional. It has a much improved D-Pad over the previous model. I tend to prefer the XBox analog stick placement to Sony's insistence that they should go low for tiny-handed folks. One of my biggest gripes about Vita. But the PS4 controller is still a fine solution as well.

I should add that almost anything from Hori is excellent. You could always try a PC gamepad if the price is good.

I second Z's suggestion of arcade stick + 360/Xbone controller. If you aren't going to be playing fighters the d-pad on the 360 controller is acceptable. If you can't get both the Xbone controller sounds like a great choice.

If you do get a Xone controller get a newer model with the rubber grips. Much more comfortable to use.

X Box One or Dualshock 4. I like them both a lot, the subtle changes from DS3 to DS4 improve it a lot. XB1 actually fixed most of what I didn't like about the 360(mainly the dpad). XB1 also works with Windows out of the box.

Can you get the DS3 to work on PC just by using the USB cable?

Can you get the DS3 to work on PC just by using the USB cable?

I've plugged it in on my Linux machine to charge, and it looks to actually recognize the device. I've not tested it though.

Can you get the DS3 to work on PC just by using the USB cable?

I used some software called DS3 Tool for that.

Can you get the DS3 to work on PC just by using the USB cable?

There's no official drivers for it. As mentioned aboive, there is that DS3 Tool to get it working. As for DS4, supposedly Steam is adding support for it. Unsure if it works otherwise, a spare XB1 controller is good enough for the few PC titles I feel the need to use a controller with.

Interesting. I only ask because I've got Ys Origins to play eventually and own it on Steam but have never spent much time trying to get a controller working yet.

I have some official usb PC cord adapter thingy I found at half price. Claims it's to connect the 360 to PC. Was cheap so I got it anyway.

If you want to use a 360 controller, I'd suggest just getting a wired one. XB1 uses any micro-usb cable to connect, no batteries required.

I've already got regular 360 controllers that are wireless/rechargeable, I figure I could use that already but I hate the dpad.

I've already got regular 360 controllers that are wireless/rechargeable, I figure I could use that already but I hate the dpad.

As far as I am aware, you actually need to buy a dongle to connect them to a PC. The charging port doesn't have a data line, or so I've read.

Oh, I didn't know that. I thought if you had it plugged in while using it worked as a regular controller. Hmmm.

Oh, I didn't know that. I thought if you had it plugged in while using it worked as a regular controller. Hmmm.
Only on a 360.

I plugged my DS3 in my machine and saw that it was identified. It created a joystick device but the drivers werent there. I didn't continue since current PC is nearly dead anyway.

my recommendation for controller is an Xbone (buy USB wire) or wired xbox 360 controller. Xbone controller is better, but 360 is cheaper. Windows based OS is PnP no fuss set up for both.

also recommend any 360 based joystick for same reason as above (I have a mad catz brawl stick. SUPER easy to mod and switch out the crap joystick + buttons. I replaced the awful original sticker art with the Rock looking like Adam Sandler with a laminated print of Kenny Rogers)

its also possible to use just about any console controller that can be hooked up with USB. AKA PS3, PS4 and the Wii U controller if you have one. The bad bit is none of these are PnP and you have to find freeware somewhere online that will enable them.

I'm a firm believer that ever since the type-S Xbox controller, Microsoft has been making some of the best, followed by Wavebird and Dual Shock 4.

Well, I finally ordered one (yes, on xmas day). Went with the PS4 controller because I order everything through Amazon, and unfortunately it turns out that Amazon doesn't make a distinction between the old and new xbone controllers. Didn't want to risk ending up with the old model instead of the new one.

Thanks for all your suggestions!

It's easy to tell once you see it. (after seeing it on my own controller) But I bet you'll like the PS4 controller.

Well, I finally ordered one (yes, on xmas day). Went with the PS4 controller because I order everything through Amazon, and unfortunately it turns out that Amazon doesn't make a distinction between the old and new xbone controllers. Didn't want to risk ending up with the old model instead of the new one.

Thanks for all your suggestions!

Hope it works well. Really, though, the transforming D-Pad version of the updated 360 controller is pretty awesome. See thread comments and photo here: http://www.gaijinworks.com/interact/showthread.php?1348-why-are-people-buying-ps4-and-xbox-one&p=96517&viewfull=1#post96517

DualShock 4 for me.
I used to use a DualShock 2 - USB adapter.
But man, those controllers break, and fast.
In 10 years I had to use like 4 or 5 different ones. I dont even play THAT MUCH and Im very careful, but any button can start to become unresponsive, or stuck.

When I experimented with the DualShock 4, I was so happy that it became my new Offical PC controller.
It feels tough too. I don't think this controller is going to get bad buttons for a looong time.

I then tried an XBone controller, hated it. The plastics feel like a fake chinese controller. The buttons are too clicky and loud.
And worst of all, I'm a d-pad fan, but the d-pad in the XBone controller is so wrongly positioned, that my thumb accidentally touches the RIGHT stick while im using the dpad!

The input lag is really low too on the DualShock 4 (and probably XBone too but that's besides the point) I think because it's a direct USB connection rather than an adapter.
I THINK the USB adapter was giving me a tiny amount of lag.
As of right now, for testing, I can fight Mike Tyson in Punch Out with very little problems (with the right settings too though).
I don't play rythm games though.

DualShock 4 for me.
I used to use a DualShock 2 - USB adapter.
But man, those controllers break, and fast.
In 10 years I had to use like 4 or 5 different ones. I dont even play THAT MUCH and Im very careful, but any button can start to become unresponsive, or stuck.

When I experimented with the DualShock 4, I was so happy that it became my new Offical PC controller.
It feels tough too. I don't think this controller is going to get bad buttons for a looong time.

I then tried an XBone controller, hated it. The plastics feel like a fake chinese controller. The buttons are too clicky and loud.
And worst of all, I'm a d-pad fan, but the d-pad in the XBone controller is so wrongly positioned, that my thumb accidentally touches the RIGHT stick while im using the dpad!

The input lag is really low too on the DualShock 4 (and probably XBone too but that's besides the point) I think because it's a direct USB connection rather than an adapter.
I THINK the USB adapter was giving me a tiny amount of lag.
As of right now, for testing, I can fight Mike Tyson in Punch Out with very little problems (with the right settings too though).
I don't play rythm games though.

I hear that the original XBone controller is pretty bad, unlike the 360 controller. Evidently Microsoft sunk ridiculous amounts of money into it and turned up with something sub-optimal. I guess that they fixed it with the Elite and Type-S versions, but the Elite controller is insanely expensive. Like $140.

And wasn't the original XBone controller made in the U.S.? I expected more quality.
Actually, I've bought a fake WiiU Pro controller from China, and that one felt better too. I think it was less than $15. Doesn't work on PC but just making a point about how disappointed I was with the XBone controller, that even a cheap knockoff gave me better results.

With the DualShock 4, I was SO HAPPY with it, that I gifted one to a friend :D

Oh and BTW, setting up the XBone controller to work with PC was an ordeal.
Something about it not installing automatically and me having to look for drivers online cause of an issue with Microsoft or something. It took me over an hour to figure out.
The DualShock 4 was just plug it in, and it works.
Additionally, people have made a nice program for it if you need to use its specific features or ensuring that it works with almost ALL PC games (like those games that only accept XBOX controllers).

DualShock 4 for me.
I used to use a DualShock 2 - USB adapter.
But man, those controllers break, and fast.
In 10 years I had to use like 4 or 5 different ones. I dont even play THAT MUCH and Im very careful, but any button can start to become unresponsive, or stuck.

When I experimented with the DualShock 4, I was so happy that it became my new Offical PC controller.
It feels tough too. I don't think this controller is going to get bad buttons for a looong time.

I then tried an XBone controller, hated it. The plastics feel like a fake chinese controller. The buttons are too clicky and loud.
And worst of all, I'm a d-pad fan, but the d-pad in the XBone controller is so wrongly positioned, that my thumb accidentally touches the RIGHT stick while im using the dpad!

The input lag is really low too on the DualShock 4 (and probably XBone too but that's besides the point) I think because it's a direct USB connection rather than an adapter.
I THINK the USB adapter was giving me a tiny amount of lag.
As of right now, for testing, I can fight Mike Tyson in Punch Out with very little problems (with the right settings too though).
I don't play rythm games though.

I've never had a dualshock 2 die on me, interesting.

I tried fixing them too! (At least from using my experience cleaning GameBoys and some other old consoles). DS2 refused to be fixed with my methods.
I have a PS1 controller that looks like it's got some heavy use, but all buttons work! Except, the D-Pad feels hard. It hurts my thumb.

Every button and d-pad on the DualShock 4 feels great, only flaw I can notice is that somehow the buttons are either too big or too spaced apart.
I'm not sure what it is, but I feel a lot more quick to rapid shoot with an NES or SNES controller than I do with the DS4.

I honestly can not tell the difference between an XBone and Xbone S controller, aside from the back being less smooth for better grip.

Some thoughts after using the PS4 controller on PC for a while;

+Fantastic D-Pad, one of the best I've ever used.
+Triggers are well made and have a better shape then on PS3
+Textured grip is nice, feels less cheap then PS1/PS2/PS3 controllers.
+Response times are great, have not been able to notice any input lag on PC at all.
+Works perfectly with any game that supports 360 controls on PC, no extra fiddling required.

-Doesn't come with the necessary USB cord, and doesn't work with the same USB cords from PS3/PSP.
-The Options and Share buttons are hard to press without also pressing the touch pad, extremely cramped.
-Joysticks feel a little weird and are probably smaller then they should be (result of cramped design?)
-Requires 3rd party software running in system tray on Windows to work properly (not just drivers).
-Steam does not work with it unless you instal 3rd party drivers first (official Sony ones don't exist).

-Doesn't come with the necessary USB cord, and doesn't work with the same USB cords from PS3/PSP.
Universal cord though. Same cord Vita 2k uses. I've got extra from thrift.

-The Options and Share buttons are hard to press without also pressing the touch pad, extremely cramped.
I think the only time I may have done that was the first day I used it.

I think the only time I may have done that was the first day I used it.

Yea part of it has to do with me having larger hands, I had difficulty with the Gamecube D-Pad too as a result.

Yea part of it has to do with me having larger hands, I had difficulty with the Gamecube D-Pad too as a result.

Got large hands eh? :rolleyes:

DS3 Tool/Motioninjoy has been being a pain in the ass.

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PS2 Controller For PC Archives

www.makeuseof.com

What do PlayStation 2 controllers, Rock Band guitars, the EyeToy, and the PS2 DVD remote all have in common? They've all been in your closet for gathering dust. However, you can still put these devices to use by connecting them to your computer.

It's understandable that you don't get much use out of your PlayStation 2 anymore. It's now a retro gaming console, with several generations of hardware succeeding it. However, while the console itself may not be of much use, its peripherals can still come in handy.

Use Your PlayStation Controllers With Your PC

Yes, you can use your PlayStation controllers on your PC. No, it's not free.

You're going to need to purchase a PlayStation to USB dongle. Don't panic, though; these are affordable. Google Shopping lists many such devices for under $10, much cheaper than buying a USB joystick for your computer.

If you're wondering how to use your PS2 controller on your PC, all it takes is plugging it in with the adapter. Once you have the device you've got one of the best PC joysticks money can buy.

PlayStation 2 controllers still hold up quite well, and you'll feel right at home using them in a wide variety of games. They work perfectly for playing old-school console games on your computer, or with any game that supports the joystick natively.

Of course, these controllers aren't as well-supported as a PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, or Xbox One controller is on a modern PC. In the case of the Xbox controllers, you'll find them natively supported in most recent PC games, while some support the PS4 controller as well. That said, if you just love the feel of the DualShock 2, it's nice to be able to use it.

Despite PlayStation 2 controllers working well on PC with a dongle, this doesn't work for anything that plugs into a PS2 controller port. For example, you can find multiple reports across the internet of PS2 owners trying to get their arcade sticks working with no success. You might luck out, but don't expect your arcade stick or driving wheel to work without problems.

This may be true for third-party PS2 controllers on PC as well. Some will work while others may not. This is hard to test due to the sheer number of third-party PS2 controllers.

Retrieve Your PS2 Saves From Old Memory Cards

Even if you don't use your old PlayStation 2, you may want access to your save data. Since these saves aren't doing you any good sitting on an old memory card in your closet, you might as well move them from your PS2 to your PC. Whether you're playing your old games on your PC or you simply want to back them up, it can be nice to have them around.

As with using PS2 controllers on PC, this requires a piece of hardware. Unfortunately, this hardware isn't especially cheap. There are a number of different devices you can use but one popular option is the PlayStation 2 Action Replay. At the time of writing this article, this sells for $279, so you would need to be pretty serious about your saved PS2 games to purchase one.

That said, this isn't the only thing this device can do. You can also download completed save files for games, or even manipulated saves that give you a maxed-out character or all the weapons in the game, for example. If you're looking for a way to breathe some life into old PS2 games, this is one way to do it.

Use the PlayStation 2 EyeToy on Your PC

The EyeToy was an early, clunky version of Microsoft's Kinect, and like that device, the EyeToy never really took off. Few games made use of the peripheral, and those that did were clunky and difficult to use. The EyeToy developed a bad reputation straight out of the gate and was quickly forgotten.

Fortunately, you can use the EyeToy as a webcam on your Windows, macOS, or Linux PC. It uses a standard USB port, so you won't need to buy any new hardware in order to get it to work.

If you're using a Linux distribution like Ubuntu, the EyeToy should be supported out of the box. Simply plug it into a free USB port and it should be ready to use. This may differ from distribution to distribution, but with a little searching, you should be able to get it working.

For macOS users, you don't get EyeToy support built into macOS, but getting the EyeToy working is simple. Support comes courtesy of the macam project, which lists the EyeToy as fully supported on its camera support page.

For Windows, things are slightly more up in the air. You can find Windows drivers for the EyeToy from the EyeToy on Computer project. The problem is that this project appears to be gone. While you can still find the drivers to download, there are no instructions on using them.

Even if you do get it working, the EyeToy is pretty dated by modern camera standards. If you're just trying to get it working to say you did or because you don't want to shell out money for a webcam, feel free to try. For a much nicer experience, try taking a look at our guide to the best budget webcams.

Use the PS2 DVD Remote With Your Computer

Part of the reason the PlayStation 2 sold so well is that it doubled as a DVD player. Sony capitalized on this functionality, selling a PS2 DVD remote that let you just the console to watch movies without needing to pick up the controller. If you still have the controller and the dongle that plugged into the PS2, you can easily use them with your PC.

You'll need the same PlayStation 2 to USB dongle that you need to plug in a controller. Simply plug the dongle into the adapter, plug that into your PC, and you'll be able to use the remote with your PC. If your PS2 DVD remote is otherwise going to waste, this is a nice way to make use of it.

We haven't tested this, but the DVD remote might even function as a remote for using Kodi from your couch.

Use Your Old Guitar Hero/Rock Band Guitars

Even if you don't have some plastic instruments lurking somewhere in your closet, the chances are you know someone who does. While the glory days of the Guitar Hero and Rock Band franchises is long gone, that doesn't mean those plastic guitars are useless. For proof, look no further than Frets on Fire.

An open source clone of the Guitar Hero and Rock Band games, Frets on Fire is available for Windows, macOS, and Linux. It supports a wide range of plastic instruments, including your old PS2 plastic guitars. Even better, it can rip songs from Guitar Hero and Guitar Hero 2. All you need to do is insert the game DVDs and let Frets on Fire do the rest.

Using your old PlayStation 2 guitars works just the same as how you use your PS2 controller on PC. Just plug them into the PlayStation 2 to USB adapter and plug that into the computer. Once you've done this, you're ready to rock.

And if you're the hacking type, know that there are many mods out there capable of making Frets on Fire even better. Check them out!

Don't Forget About Your Old PlayStation 2 Games

Yes, the hardware might be dated but there are plenty of great games for the PlayStation 2.

If you have a PlayStation 2 or PlayStation 3, you could pay for them again to play them on your new console, but that's not your only option. You could buy an expensive upscaler like a Framemeister to plug your PS2 into your TV, or you could play those games on your PC.

While the link with video game piracy makes people think that playing games via emulators is illegal, that isn't the case. As long as you actually own the games, you're free to use emulators and ROMs.

If you feel like firing up your old games again with a shiny higher resolution, we have a guide explaining how to play PS2 games on your computer. Now would be a great time to revisit some of the classics, such as the best PlayStation 2 RPGs of all time.

Image Credit: kolidzeitattoo/Depositphotos

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About The Author
Kris Wouk (112 Articles Published)

Kris Wouk is a musician, writer, and whatever it's called when someone makes videos for the web. A tech enthusiast for as long as he can remember, he definitely has favorite operating systems and devices, but uses as many others as he can anyway, just to stay caught up.

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